Cashman says Boone made decision to move Torres to second

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CARLSBAD, Calif. — Yankees manager Aaron Boone made the decision to shift Gleyber Torres from shortstop to second base late in the season.

General manager Brian Cashman said there was not a single instance that led to the decision.

“Maybe through a lot of therapy I forgot and eliminated it, but ultimately once he moved over to second, it was almost a relief for him,” Cashman said. “So I’m sure there was a buildup over the course of a week or a 10-day period that a few things happened and it was like we have to do something here.

“And that came from the manager’s chair, and he did it. He just told me `This is what I think we’ve got to do, and we’re going to do it,’ and I said: `no problem.”‘

Torres, who turns 25 next month, was primarily a second baseman during his first two seasons with the Yankees in 2018 and 2019. He filled in at shortstop when Didi Gregorius got hurt and was moved there for 2020 after Gregorius left as a free agent.

Torres made 18 errors at shortstop, third in the AL behind 24 by Toronto’s Bo Bichette and 19 by Texas’ Isiah Kiner-Falefa. Torres was moved to second base on Sept. 13 with three weeks left in the regular season.

Torres hit .259 with nine homers and 51 RBIs, up from .243 with three homers and 16 RBIs during the pandemic-shortened 2020 season but down from .278 with 38 homers and 90 RBIs in 2019, when made the AL All-Star team for the second straight season.

Cashman is in the market for a shortstop.

“Once we signed (DJ) LeMahieu back, we knew that it was going to cement Gleyber as our shortstop, and so we had hopes that it was going to work out, but it didn’t,” Cashman said.

ON COLE

Cashman praised ace Gerrit Cole, a finalist for the AL Cy Young Award after going 16-8 with a 3.23 ERA despite second-half struggles.

Cole began 8-3 with a 2.31 ERA in 14 starts. Then, after Major League Baseball launched its crackdown on unauthorized grip substances on June 21, Cole went 8-5 with a 4.12 ERA in 16 starts.

“He was fantastic for us this year,” Cashman said, “despite obviously injuries” and “some changes in the game.”

Cole was 1-1 with a 7.64 ERA in his last three starts after returning from left hamstring tightness and lost the AL wild card game against Boston, allowing two homers and three runs while lasting two innings.

“He’s never going to say the hamstring bothered him, once he kept going again. He’s never going to say he was tired,” Cashman said. “But I think all of that’s possible.”

JUDGE

Cashman said the Yankees will have contract talks with the agent for Aaron Judge, who is eligible for free agency after next season. Judge is eligible for salary arbitration after making $10,175,000, and New York could try to negotiate a multiyear deal.

FRAZIER

Outfielder Clint Frazier did not play after June 30 because of what the Yankees have listed as vertigo. Cashman said Frazier is working out in Atlanta ahead of 2022.

“There’s a lot of expectation and optimism that what transpired will not be an issue as he enters next season,” Cashman said.

Cashman wouldn’t detail any new information on Frazier’s diagnosis, saying “he can speak to it at some point whenever he’s comfortable doing so.”

Frazier missed a large portion of 2018 with a concussion after he collided with an outfield wall during a spring training game at Bradenton, Florida.

“I’d love to have the opportunity to talk about this situation publicly and probably plan to do so soon,” Frazier wrote on Twitter on Oct. 11. “My issues have been very personal to me and something I’ve wanted to handle privately, but there’s been a lot of inaccurate things reported about my injury that I’ll clear up.”

A’s running out of time to find home in Oakland, Las Vegas

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LAS VEGAS — The Oakland Athletics have spent years trying to get a new stadium while watching Bay Area neighbors such as the Giants, Warriors, 49ers and Raiders successfully move into state-of-the-art venues, and now time is running short on their efforts.

The A’s lease at RingCentral Coliseum expires after the 2024 season, and though they might be forced to extend the terms, the club and Major League Baseball have deemed the stadium unsuitable for a professional franchise.

They are searching for a new stadium in Oakland or Las Vegas, but they have experienced difficulties in both areas. The A’s missed a major deadline in October to get a deal done in Oakland, and there has been little indication they will receive the kind of funding they want from Las Vegas.

“I think the A’s have to look at it in a couple of ways,” said Brendan Bussmann, managing partner at Las Vegas-based B Global. “Obviously, they have struggled in Oakland to get a deal across the line. It isn’t for a lack of effort. . You have an owner that’s willing to pony up money, you have a club that wants to sit there and figure out a way to make it work, and you keep running into obstacles along the way.

“It’s time to fish or cut bait. Oakland, do you want them or not? And if not, where are the A’s going to get the best deal? Is it Vegas? Is it somewhere else? They’ll have to figure that out.”

What the A’s are thinking is a little bit of a mystery. Team President Dave Kaval was talkative earlier in the process, saying the A’s are pursuing two different tracks with Oakland and Las Vegas. But he went silent on the subject several months ago. A’s spokeswoman Catherine Aker said mostly recently that the club would withhold comment for now.

The A’s have been negotiating with Oakland to build a $1 billion stadium as part of a $12 billion redevelopment deal.

Newly elected Mayor Sheng Thao said reaching a deal is important as long as it makes economic sense to the city. Her predecessor, Libby Schaaf, led prior efforts to reach an agreement, but after the city and the A’s missed that October deadline, MLB Commissioner Rob Manfred expressed reservations a deal will ever get done.

“The pace in Oakland has not been rapid, number one,” Manfred said at the time. “We’re in a stadium situation that’s really not tenable. I mean, we need to do something to alter the situation. So I’m concerned about the lack of pace.”

Recent California history justifies his concerns. SoFi Stadium in Southern California and Chase Center in San Francisco were built with private money, and Levi’s Stadium in Santa Clara was 90% privately financed.

“And then I think there was some contagion where around the country people realized these deals could be done well privately and could generate a return on investment to those investors,” said David Carter, a sports business professor at the University of Southern California. “Why are we throwing public money at it at all?”

That’s also a question being asked in Las Vegas, even though the Raiders in 2016 received $750 million from the Nevada Legislature for a stadium. That then was the largest amount of public money for a sports venue, but it was surpassed last March by the $850 million pledged to construct a new stadium for the NFL’s Buffalo Bills.

Another deal like the one for Allegiant Stadium, where the Raiders play, appears unlikely in Nevada. T-Mobile Arena, which opened in 2017, was privately financed. An arena planned for south of the Las Vegas Strip also wouldn’t rely on public funds.

Las Vegas, however, has shown financing creativity. Its Triple-A baseball stadium received $80 million in 2017 for naming rights from the Las Vegas Convention and Visitors Authority. Room taxes fund the authority, so it was public money in a backdoor sort of way.

Clark County Commissioner Michael Naft, who is on the board of the convention authority, has spoken with A’s representatives about their interest in Las Vegas and said he is aware of the club’s talks with other Nevada officials. He said the A’s are taking a much different approach than the Raiders, who identified Las Vegas early as their choice landing spot after many years of failing to get a new stadium in Oakland.

“When the Raiders decided to come to Las Vegas, they had a clear plan,” Naft said. “You had a clear body that was tasked with assessing the worth and the value, and they committed to the destination. I have not seen that from the Oakland A’s at any level, and it’s not really our job to go out and beg them to come here because we have earned the reputation of the greatest arena on Earth. We have put in both the dollars and the labor to make that the case.

“I think I’ve made myself clear, but from conversations with others, I don’t think I’m alone on that.”

New Nevada Gov. Joe Lombardo “will not raise taxes” to attract the A’s or any other team, his spokeswoman, Elizabeth Ray, said in a statement. But she said the club could qualify for other ongoing “economic development programs,” which could mean tax breaks similar to what Tesla received in 2014.

Manfred said in December that the A’s relocation fee would be waived if they move to Las Vegas, a savings to the club reportedly of up to $1 billion.

“We’re past any reasonable timeline for the situation in Oakland to be resolved,” Manfred said then.

Naft said Allegiant Stadium filled a hole that went beyond landing an NFL team. It allowed Las Vegas to attract major sporting events such as the Super Bowl and Final Four and major concerts such as Garth Brooks and Elton John that “in many cases we would not otherwise have.”

He said he doesn’t believe a baseball stadium would accomplish that, and sports economist Victor Matheson agreed.

“I think there’s a real question about how much people are willing to watch baseball in Las Vegas,” said Matheson, a professor at College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts. “It’s not like locals don’t have a huge number of entertainment options right now, and it’s not clear exactly how much people might travel to watch baseball in Vegas, either.”

If the A’s truly want to be in Las Vegas, Naft said they need to make that clear.

“I just believe you can’t play destinations against each other,” Naft said. “If you want to come here and you want to be met with open arms, you’ve got to commit.”

Should the A’s fail to reach an agreement in Oakland or Las Vegas, they could consider other destinations such as Charlotte, North Carolina; Nashville; and Portland, Oregon. Whether they would have the time to explore such options is another question.

Oakland has already shown it will watch the Raiders move to Nevada and the Warriors go across the Bay Bridge to San Francisco.

Las Vegas, Matheson noted, is hardly in a desperate situation. He also expressed caution that Las Vegas could go from being among the largest metropolitan areas without a major professional sports team to among the smallest with three franchises.

“So you’ve gone from kind of being under-sported to being over-sported in a short period of time if the A’s were to go there,” Matheson said.