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Things are getting tense between MLB and the union

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The MLB Players Association and the league have not been on great terms for some time, but things seem to be deteriorating even further.

Yes, there is the potential for some common ground when it comes to a health and safety plan for a 2020 season, but when it comes to the dollars and cents of it all, things are looking dire.

To review:

  • On March 26, MLB and the MLBPA reached a general agreement about how to handle a 2020 baseball season. As far as money goes, there was an agreement that players would be paid on a prorated basis, but a clause in the agreement stipulated that the sides would negotiate in good faith about the economic feasibility of playing a season without fans if that was necessary. There is a lot of disagreement about what that really means;
  • A few weeks ago MLB began to make it public via leaks to reporters that it expected the players to make financial concessions, preferably in the form of a 50/50 revenue split instead of paying prorated salaries. The players, via public statements of union executive director Tony Clark, made it clear that they would not accept that if it were proposed;
  • On May 13 the union nonetheless requested that the league provide it with financial documentation to justify any financial concessions it expects the players to make. The MLBPA has a right to make such a demand under the Collective Bargaining Agreement;
  • Since then a steady stream of leaks from the MLB side of things to MLB-friendly reporters has attempted to push the case that the players are not merely obligated to negotiate with the league, but they are somehow locked into making certain concessions;
  • The most notable of these leaks occurred two day ago when Joel Sherman of the New York Post was given some internal emails from Major League Baseball which his sources attempted to portray as some kind of “smoking gun” that committed the players to do . . . something. For a ton of reasons, both legal and practical, some of which I talked about here, the story Sherman’s sources were trying to create was nonsense. 

Lost in that noise, however, is the fact that . . . Major League Baseball has not yet made a financial proposal to or demand of the players yet. Really, they haven’t. As late as this morning it was reported that they’d be making a formal proposal early next week. But no, there is no demand on the table. All of the demands in the press that the players compromise, fueled as they have been by anonymous sources affiliated with MLB, are, essentially, demands that the players bid against themselves.

Against that backdrop comes this a few minutes ago from Jon Heyman:

Which, yes, that’s a leak too, so it’s not just MLB who is talking to the press about this.

But it does establish that, as the two sides have been presented with the extraordinarily difficult task of coming to an agreement to play a season under unprecedented circumstances that may, in the best of circumstances, be nearly impossible to pull off, MLB’s campaign of trying to negotiate via the media before it even makes a presentation to the players — and before it even gives the players the information they have requested in order to assess any such presentations — has made things even harder.

Clayton Kershaw to make Opening Day start for Dodgers

Clayton Kershaw Opening Day
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Dodgers manager Dave Roberts confirmed it in March and he confirmed it again on Tuesday: Clayton Kershaw will start on Opening Day, Jorge Castillo of The Los Angeles Times reports.

The Dodgers are one of four teams that will open the 60-game regular season schedule on July 23; everyone else begins play on the 24th. With a 10 PM ET start, the Dodgers will host the Giants at Dodger Stadium.

Johnny Cueto will likely pitch opposite Kershaw for the Giants. Cueto was named the Giants’ Opening Day starter on March 11, before the league shut down due to the coronavirus pandemic. Manager Gabe Kapler hasn’t yet officially named an Opening Day starter for the makeshift season.

Kershaw, 32, made the Opening Day start eight consecutive times for the Dodgers from 2011-18. Hyun-Jin Ryu, now a Blue Jay, pitched on Opening Day last season for the Dodgers. Last year, Kershaw logged 178 1/3 innings over 28 starts and one relief appearance, his highest innings total since 2015. He went 16-5 with a 3.03 ERA, 189 strikeouts, and 41 walks.