Bryce Harper
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Bracket: Best walkoffs of the 2019 regular season

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It may be March, but sadly there will not be any March Madness to watch due to coronavirus (COVID-19). Filling out brackets is always such a fun part of the experience. This is a baseball blog, but I thought I’d create my own bracket fun. Today, I’ll go over the best walk-offs of the 2019 season. As usual, I don’t expect everyone to agree with my picks, so feel free to fill out the bracket how you see fit in the comments. I will also inevitably miss some moments that might have merited inclusion, so be sure to mention those as well.

1. Bryce Harper crushes walk-off grand slam vs. Cubs (August 15)

I discussed Harper’s grand slam in yesterday’s bracket as well. Both Harper and the Phillies in general had high expectations for the 2019 season that simply weren’t met. They realistically weren’t ever going to be met, but that’s what happens when you sign the richest contract in baseball history. Harper’s season was considered disappointing by many and he didn’t have many memorable moments up until this day in mid-August. If we can pinpoint a specific moment in which public perception of Harper changed on a dime, it was this.

The Phillies entered the bottom of the ninth trailing the Cubs 5-1, seemingly on their way to a low-energy loss. However, the offense rallied for two runs and loaded the bases with one out for Harper, facing lefty Derek Holland. The rest, as they say, was history. After a five-pitch battle, Harper turned on the sixth pitch, an inside fastball, yanking it into the second deck at Citizens Bank Park for a cathartic walk-off grand slam.

2. Hunter Renfroe pinch-hits, belts salami to walk off Dodgers (May 5)

This happened early enough in the season when many still had hope for the Padres, still fresh off of signing third baseman Manny Machado. However, the club had lost five of its previous seven games and appeared headed to another loss when it entered the bottom of the ninth trailing 5-4. The Padres, however, immediately built a threat against closer Kenley Jansen, loading the bases on a line drive single followed by two bunt singles. The Padres’ efforts nearly went down in vain as they made two quick outs without bringing in a run. Renfroe saved the day, cranking out a Jansen offering to the Western Metal Supply Co. in left field for a walk-off salami.

3. Will Smith becomes third consecutive Dodger rookie to hit walk-off (June 23)

In June, the Dodgers accomplished a rather odd feat: they swept the Rockies in a three-game series, winning all three games on walk-off hits from rookies. Matt Beaty was the hero on June 21, breaking a 2-2 tie in the bottom of the ninth with a two-run homer. Alex Verdugo walked it off the next day with a solo homer in the bottom of the 11th to send the Dodgers home 5-4 winners. On June 23, it was Will Smith’s turn.

With the game tied 3-3, Beaty reached base to lead off the bottom of the ninth thanks to a throwing error. He advanced to second base on a wild pitch with one out. Russell Martin came up with two outs and was intentionally walked to bring Smith to the plate against Scott Oberg, which turned out to be a mistake. Smith muscled Oberg’s off-speed pitch over the fence in right-center field for a walk-off three-run homer.

Fun fact: The Dodgers went on a seven-game road trip after this game. When they returned home, they won two more games in walk-off fashion, giving them five consecutive walk-off wins at home.

4. Kurt Suzuki helps Nats close six-run deficit with walk-off three-run shot (September 3)

Suzuki capped off arguably the wildest comeback of the year. The Mets led the Nationals 5-2 going into the bottom of the eighth and the Nationals were able to score twice to close the gap. Things were looking grim as the Mets exploded for five runs in the top of the ninth to push their lead to 10-4. But if the Mets taught us anything in the first five months of the 2019 season, it was that their bullpen could not be trusted.

The Nats’ offense went to work against Paul Sewald, using three singles and a double to score twice while making only one out. Lefty Luis Avilán came in to face Juan Soto, but Soto won the exchange with a single to load the bases. Veteran Ryan Zimmerman, facing Mets closer Edwin Díaz, wowed the crowd with a two-run double to make it 10-8. Suzuki then completed the comeback by ripping a 3-2 fastball over the fence in left field to walk it off. The Nationals’ win probability was so low it was rounded down to zero percent at the start of the inning. It didn’t reach double digits until Soto’s single.

5. Two-way player Michael Lorenzen rips pinch-hit walk-off line drive double (September 8)

I wrote a couple days ago about why I love pitchers hitting (and playing other positions) so much, so it should not be surprising to see Lorenzen on my bracket. Lorenzen has been a pitcher for the entirety of his professional career, but the Reds converted him into a two-way player last year because he’s a good hitter and quite athletic. In 2018, he hit four homers with an OPS of 1.043 in 34 plate appearances.

On this particular day, the Diamondbacks and Reds were tied 3-3 in the bottom of the ninth. The Reds put together a threat with back-to-back one-out singles against Yoan López. With an unfavorable platoon matchup, D-Backs manager Torey Lovullo decided to bring in lefty T.J. McFarland to face Josh VanMeter. Reds manager David Bell countered, pinch-hitting Lorenzen to regain the platoon advantage. McFarland and Lorenzen battled for eight pitches, but Lorenzen emerged victorious on the ninth pitch, ripping a line drive down the left field line for a walk-off single.

Lorenzen had pulled off a Ruthian feat just a few days prior against the Phillies, hitting a pinch-hit home run, pitching two innings of relief and earning the win, and playing center field. He truly does it all.

6. Ryan Braun ends 18-inning game with walk-off two-run single (May 4)

The Brewers took a 2-1 lead into the ninth inning against the Mets, but Pete Alonso wasn’t having any of it. The eventual NL Rookie of the Year blasted a leadoff home run off of Junior Guerra to tie the game at 2-2. Little did we know that would be the last bit of scoring until the 18th inning. The two clubs traded goose eggs for eight innings.

In the top of the 18th, the Mets appeared to have finally broken through when Jeff McNeil gave them a 3-2 lead with a two-out RBI single against Taylor Williams. Mets reliever Chris Flexen, who kept the Brewers scoreless in the 17th, couldn’t find the strike zone. He walked Eric Thames to lead off the bottom half of the 18th, then issued two more one-out walks to Yasmani Grandal and Travis Shaw to load the bases for Ryan Braun. Braun, collecting his sixth hit of the night, slapped a single into right field to bring Thames and Grandal to the plate, walking the Brewers off 4-3 winners.

7. Dom Smith returns to majors after two months, smacks walk-off three-run bomb in season finale (September 29)

Smith, formerly one of the Mets’ top prospects, missed two months between late July and late September due to a stress reaction in his right foot. He wanted to return before the end of the season and got his wish, pinch-hitting in the bottom of the 11th of the 2019 regular season finale. The Braves had taken a 6-4 lead in the top half, but the Mets kept hope alive thanks to singles from Luis Guillorme and Wilson Ramos. With two outs, Smith was tasked with facing lefty Grant Dayton. Dayton badly missed his spot with a fastball and Smith took full advantage to end the season on a happy note, sending the Mets into the offseason 7-6 winners over the Braves.

8. Brian McCann notches 1,000th career RBI with walk-off two-run single (June 14)

McCann, retiring at season’s end, notched a career milestone in epic fashion against a division rival. The Braves trailed the Phillies 8-6 entering the bottom of the ninth but were slowly getting to closer Héctor Neris. Neris allowed a leadoff single to Dansby Swanson, then issued a two-out walk to Nick Markakis. Austin Riley closed the gap with an RBI double, putting the tying run on third base and the winning run on second base to bring up McCann, searching not only to win the game for the Braves but for his 1,000th career RBI as well. McCann blooped a Neris splitter into left-center field to score both runners and earn both achievements in one fell swoop.

. . .

Here’s how my bracket plays out. I am the bracket seeder and I decide who advances, so the higher seed should always win, but just to spice things up and to prevent the finals from being two walk-off slams, I had the Will Smith walk-off homer over Hunter Renfroe.

What were your favorite walk-offs of the 2019 season? What would your bracket look like?

Red Sox employees “livid” over team pay cut plan

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Even Drellich of The Athletic reports that the Boston Red Sox are cutting the pay of team employees. Those cuts, which began to be communicated last night, apply to all employees making $50,000 or more. They are tiered cuts, with people making $50-99,000 seeing salary cut by 20%, those making $100k-$499,000 seeing $25% cuts and those making $500,000 or more getting 30% cuts.

Drellich reported that a Red Sox employee told him that “people are livid” over the fact that those making $100K are being treated the same way as those making $500K. And, yes, that does seem to be a pretty wide spread for similar pay cuts. One would think that a team with as many analytically-oriented people on staff could perhaps break things down a bit more granularly.

Notable in all of this that the same folks who own the Red Sox — Fenway Sports Group — own Liverpool FC of the English Premier League, and that just last month Liverpool’s pay cut/employee furlough policies proved so unpopular that they led to a backlash and a subsequent reversal by the club. That came after intense criticism from Liverpool fan groups and local politicians. Sox owner John Henry must be confident that no such backlash will happen in Boston.

As we noted yesterday, The Kansas City Royals, who are not as financially successful as the Boston Red Sox, have not furloughed employees or cut pay as a result of baseball’s shutdown in the wake of the COVID-19 pandemic. Perhaps someone in Boston could call the Royals and ask them how they managed that.