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Tracking the arbitration-avoiding deals

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As we mentioned this morning, today is the day by which players and teams had to exchange arbitration figures. As we also mentioned this morning, that deadline has come to serve as a defacto settlement deadline, thereby inspiring most players who are eligible for arbitration to strike deals with their clubs.

The deadline for the salary figures exchange — and thus the time by which most of these arbitration-avoiding deals were done — was noon eastern. Since then a ton of one-year deals have been struck. As they trickle in today, we’ll update them all here.

The big deals, of $3 million or more:

Mookie Betts, Red Sox: $27 million (we wrote about it here)
Kris Bryant, Cubs: $18.6 million (we wrote about it earlier)
Francisco Lindor, Indians: $17.55 million
Trevor Bauer, Reds: $17.5 million
James Paxton, Yankees: $12.5 million
Marcus Stroman, Mets: $12 million
Cody Bellinger, Dodgers: $11.5 million (record for largest first-time arb-eligible player)
Alex Colome, White Sox: $10.5325 million
Javier Baez, Cubs: $10 million
Noah Syndergaard, Mets: $9.7 million
Ken Giles, Blue Jays: $9.6 million
Robbie Ray, Diamondbacks: $9.43 million
Aaron Judge, Yankees: $8.5 million
Jonathan Villar, Marlins: $8.2 million
Corey Seager, Dodgers: $7.6 million
Trea Turner, Dodgers: $7.45 million
Jorge Soler, Royals: $7.3 million
Kyle Schwarber, Cubs: $7.1 million
Kirby Yates, Padres: $7.0625 million
Mike Foltynewicz, Braves: $6.425 million
Enrique Hernandez, Dodgers: $5.9 million
Anthony DeSclafani, Reds: $5.9 million
Nomar Mazara, White Sox: $5.56 million
Jake Lamb, Diamondbacks: $5.515 million
Gary Sanchez, Yankees: $5 million
Josh Bell, Pirates: $4.8 million
Willson Contreras, Cubs: $4.5 million
Carlos Rodon, White Sox: $4.45 million
Joey Gallo, Rangers: $4.4M million
Andrew Heaney, Angels: $4.3 million
Matt Shoemaker, Blue Jays: $4.2 million
Michael Lorenzen, Reds: $3.725 million
Danny Santana, Rangers: $3.6 million
Hunter Renfroe, Rays: $3.3 million
Tommy La Stella, Angels $3.25 million
Adam Duvall, Braves: $3.25 million
Mychal Givens, Orioles: $3.225 milion
Dansby Swanson, Braves $3.15 million
Matt Barnes, Red Sox: $3.1 million
Byron Buxton, Twins: $3.075 million
Andrew Chafin, Diamondbacks: $3.045 million
Mitch Haniger, Mariners $3.01 million
Austin Hedges, Padres: $3 million

The sub-$3 million deals, which I’m not gonna put in descending order because life is too short:

Adam Frazier, Pirates: $2.8 million
Tommy Kahnle, Yankees: $2.65 million
Trey Mancini, Orioles: Unknown
Delino DeShields Jr., Indians: $1.875 million
Buck Farmer, Tigers: $1.15 million
Oliver Drake, Rays: $1.025 million
Daniel Robertson, Rays: $1.025 million
Evan Marshall, White Sox: $1.1M million
Gio Urshela, Yankees: $2.475 million
Rafael Montero, Rangers: $785,000
Nick Wittgren, Indians $1.125 million
Mallex Smith, Mariners, $2.35 million
Chris Devenski, Astros $2 million
Hanser Alberto, Orioles: $1.65 million
Tyler Duffey, Twins: $1.2 million
Chad Pinder, Athletics $2.025 million
Tyler Naquin, Indians: $1.45 million
Heath Hembree, Red Sox: $1.6125 million
Tyler Glasnow, Rays: $2.05 million
Keynan Middleton, Angels: $800,000
Sam Tuivailala, Mariners: $800,000
Curt Casali, Reds: $1.4625 million
Ross Stripling, Dodgers: up-front signing bonus of $1.5 million + 600,000 for the 2020 season (weird)
John Gant, Cardinals $1.35 million
Carlos Estevez, Rockies: $1.08 million
Julio Urias, Dodgers: $1 million
Omar Narvaez, Brewers: $2.725 million
Roenis Elias, Nationals: $1.975 million
Joe Ross, Nationals: $1.5 million
Michael Feliz, Pirates: $1.1 million
Trevor Williams, Pirates: $2.825 million
Manuel Margot, Padres: $2.475 million
Johan Camargo, Braves: $1.7 million
Grant Dayton, Braves: $655,000
Luke Jackson, Braves: $1.825 million
Albert Almora, Braves: $1.575 million
Adam Morgan, Phillies: $1.575 million
Chad Kuhl, Pirates: $840,000
Luis Perdomo, Padres: $950,000
Matt Andriese, Dimamondbacks: $1.395 million
Jameson Taillon, Pirates: $2.25 million
Robert Gsellman, Mets: $1.225 million

MLBPA: MLB’s ‘demand for additional concessions was resoundingly rejected’

Rob Manfred and Tony Clark
LG Patterson/MLB via Getty Images
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On Thursday evening, the Major League Baseball Players Association released a statement regarding ongoing negotiations between the owners and the union. The two sides continue to hash out details concerning a 2020 season. The owners want a shorter season, around 50 games. The union recently proposed a 114-game season that also offered the possibility of salary deferrals.

MLBPA executive director Tony Clark said that the union held a conference call that included the Executive Board and MLBPA player leaders. They “resoundingly rejected” the league’s “demand for additional concessions.”

The full statement:

In this time of unprecedented suffering at home and abroad, Players want nothing more than to get back to work and provide baseball fans with the game we all love. But we cannot do this alone.

Earlier this week, Major League Baseball communicated its intention to schedule a dramatically shortened 2020 season unless Players negotiate salary concessions. The concessions being sought are in addition to billions in Player salary reductions that have already been agreed upon.

This threat came in response to an Association proposal aimed at charting a path forward. Among other things, Players proposed more games, two years of expanded playoffs, salary deferrals in the event of a 2020 playoff cancellation, and the exploration of additional jewel events and broadcast enhancements aimed at creatively bringing our Players to the fans while simultaneously increasing the value of our product. Rather than engage, the league replied it will shorten the season unless Players agree to further salary reductions.

Earlier today we held a conference call of the Association’s Executive Board and several other MLBPA Player leaders. The overwhelming consensus of the Board is that Players are ready to report, ready to get back on the field, and they are willing to do so under unprecedented conditions that could affect the health and safety of not just themselves, but their families as well. The league’s demand for additional concessions was resoundingly rejected.

Important work remains to be done in order to safely resume the season. We stand ready to complete that work and look forward to getting back on the field.

As per the current agreement signed in March, if there is a 2020 season, players will be paid on a prorated basis. Thus, fewer games means the players get paid less and the owners save more. MLB has threatened to unilaterally set a 2020 season in motion if the two sides cannot come to terms. It should come as no surprise that the union has responded strongly on both fronts.

There have been varying reports in recent days over the confidence in a 2020 season happening. The MLBPA’s statement tonight doesn’t move the needle any; it simply affirms that the union remains steadfast in its goal to avoid a second significant cut in salaries.

As I see it, the ball is in the owners’ court. The owners can strongarm the players into a short season, saving money but significantly increasing the odds of a big fight in upcoming collective bargaining agreement negotiations. Or the owners can eat more of a financial loss, agreeing to a longer season than they feel is comfortable. The latter would have the double benefit of not damaging overall perception of the sport and would not disrupt labor peace going forward.

The MLBPA statement included a declaration that the players are “ready to report, ready to get back on the field, and they are willing to do so under unprecedented conditions.” If there is no 2020 season, we will have only the owners to blame, not the players.

Update: Cardinals pitcher Jack Flaherty, who has been quite vocal on social media about these negotiations, chimed in: