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Yoenis Céspedes’ ankle injury was suffered ‘after an interaction with a wild boar’

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Last May, while rehabbing from heel surgery, Mets outfielder Yoenis Céspedes suffered an accident on his ranch, described as a “violent fall,” that resulted in multiple ankle fractures.

At the time there was widespread speculation that the injury occurred while he was engaging in activities that were (a) prohibited by his player contract, such as riding horses; and (b) probably a bad idea regardless given that he was rehabbing from surgery. The Mets certainly believed so as they began to withhold his 2019 salary.

That dispute recently led to an agreement between Céspedes and the Mets that resulted in Céspedes receiving a “significant reduction” of his 2020 salary, which was supposed to be $29.5 million. That reduction will cost him a minimum of $15.7 million and could cost him as much as $30 million.

This evening the New York Post reports what actually happened last May. And, no, it was not what anyone was expecting:

The Post has learned all involved parties agreed that Cespedes was injured on the ranch stepping into a hole after an interaction with a wild boar.

According to multiple people who were informed of the incident, Cespedes has traps on his ranch for a variety of reasons, including to keep boars away from people. But one boar was removed from a trap — perhaps by Cespedes — and either charged toward Cespedes or startled him, causing Cespedes to step into a hole.

Like I said: we weren’t expecting that.

Céspedes, 34, played in a only 119 games combined in 2017-18 before missing the entire 2019 campaign. He is said to have resumed baseball activities and should be ready to go for spring training.

Can’t wait for spring training. It’s not likely to be boaring.

(Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images)

Report: David Price to pay each Dodgers minor leaguer $1,000 out of his own pocket

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Francys Romero reports that, according to his sources, Dodgers pitcher David Price will pay $1,000 out of his own money to each Dodgers minor leaguer who is not on the 40-man roster during the month of June.

That’s a pretty amazing gesture from Price. It’s also extraordinarily telling that such a gesture is even necessary.

Under a March agreement with Major League Baseball, minor leaguers have been receiving financial assistance that is set to expire at the end of May. Baseball America reported earlier this week that the Dodgers will continue to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week past May 31, but it is unclear how long such payments would go. Even if one were to assume that the payments will continue throughout the month of June, however, it’s worth noting that $400 a week is not a substantial amount of money for players to live on, on which to support families, and on which to train and remain ready to play baseball if and when they are asked to return.

Price’s generosity should be lauded here, but this should not be considered a feel-good story overall. Major League Baseball, which has always woefully underpaid its minor leaguers has left them in a vulnerable position once again.