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Hawk Harrelson wins the Ford C. Frick Award

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SAN DIEGO — Ken “Hawk” Harrelson — the man with the well-known  “You can put it on the boooooard . . . yes!” home run call — has been selected as the 2020 recipient of the Ford C. Frick Award, presented annually for excellence in broadcasting by the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum.

Harrelson, 78, played in the majors for nine seasons with the A’s, Red Sox, Indians and Senators and led the AL in RBI in 1968. He began broadcasting Red Sox games in 1975 before joining the White Sox broadcasting team in 1982. He served as the team’s general manager in 1985, joined the Yankees as a broadcaster in 1987 and then returned to the White Sox booth in 1989. He retired following the 2018 season.

Harrelson was not everyone’s favorite broadcaster. Non-White Sox fans criticized him for being a “homer” and accused him of openly rooting for Chicago. He called the ChiSox”the good guys,” as opposed to the “bad guys” playing them.

But that wasn’t always the case. In fact, he was fired by the Red Sox for being critical of team ownership. And even with his open preference for White Sox victories, Harrelson was a beloved institution among Sox fans. They invited him into their homes every single night for decades and you don’t do that if you don’t like what the man is doing.

Congratulations to Hawk Harrelson. The latest Ford C. Frick Award winner.

Report: 11 umpires have opted out of the 2020 season

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Jon Heyman reports that 11 MLB umpires have opted out of the 2020 season or have otherwise declined to participate. He says “some are said to have family members who are ill.” The umpires’ identities are not yet known.

Umpires, like players, have the right to opt-out with full pay if they are in a high risk group due to preexisting health conditions. Umpires can, obviously, be older as well, so age factors into it for some as well. Also like players, umpires who are themselves not high risk can opt-out if they have concern for the health of family members, though they will forego paychecks.

Recently, one umpire who is high risk — Joe West — made headlines for not only choosing not to opt-out but for also giving voice to COVID-19 denialism, questioning official statistics about infections and deaths.

The latest on West: