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56 players non-tendered, become free agents

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With Monday’s 8 PM ET contract tendering deadline past, it’s official: 56 players were not tendered contracts and are now free agents, according to Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports. There were over 200 players, so roughly 75 percent of eligible players were tendered contracts.

We mentioned that shortstop Addison Russell is among them. Other notable players not tendered contracts include outfielder Kevin Pillar (who received an MVP vote), shortstop Tim Beckham, second baseman César Hernández, third baseman Maikel Franco, starter Taijuan Walker, starter Jimmy Nelson, reliever Blake Treinen, infielder José Peraza, and catcher Josh Phegley.

Teams consider a player’s health, age, and production when deciding whether or not to tender them contracts, as well their projected salaries in arbitration and the teams’ own payroll flexibility. Non-tendered players also open up a spot on the 40-man roster, which can be important for some teams with the Rule 5 draft that will take place next week during the Winter Meetings.

Report: Mets sign Brad Brach to one-year, $850,000 contract

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The Athletic’s Ken Rosenthal reports that the Mets and free agent reliever Brad Brach have agreed on a one-year deal worth $850,000. The contract includes a player option for the 2021 season with a base salary of $1.25 million and additional performance incentives.

Brach, 33, signed as a free agent with the Cubs this past February. After posting an ugly 6.13 ERA over 39 2/3 innings, the Cubs released him in early August. The Mets picked him up shortly thereafter. Brach’s performance improved, limiting opposing hitters to six runs on 15 hits and three walks with 15 strikeouts in 14 2/3 innings through the end of the season.

While Brach will add some much-needed depth to the Mets’ bullpen, his walk rate has been going in the wrong direction for the last three seasons. It went from eight percent in 2016 to 9.5, 9.7, and 12.8 percent from 2017-19. Needless to say the Mets are hoping that trend starts heading in the other direction next season.