Tim Warner/Getty Images

Former major leaguers think Tyler Glasnow was tipping his pitches

11 Comments

Rays starter Tyler Glasnow didn’t have time to get settled in during his ALDS Game 5 start against the Astros, surrendering four straight hits and ultimately four runs in the first inning. The Rays would go on to lose the decisive playoff game 6-1.

Glasnow’s night wasn’t long, as he lasted only 2 2/3 innings, but he was otherwise solid outside of the first six batters. He ended the first inning with back-to-back strikeouts, then worked a 1-2-3 bottom of the second with a strikeout and two weak pop-ups. He got another pop-up and a ground out in the third before manager Kevin Cash removed him in favor of lefty Blake Snell.

On the FS1 broadcast, Joe Girardi and A.J. Pierzynski ruminated that Glasnow may have been tipping his pitches. Some former players were more confident that Glasnow was, in fact, tipping his pitches.

Phillies radio analyst Kevin Frandsen tweeted, “Glasnow never changed in between starts! Tips every pitch!” Frandsen, by the way, said Glasnow was tipping last week as well in Game 1 against the Astros.

Trevor Plouffe, who re-signed with the Phillies on a minor league contract for the 2019 season, responded to Frandsen, “I had his pitches this Spring Training. Every one of em and it only took an inning.”

Preston Wilson wrote, “No doubt in my mind. Glasnow is tipping his pitches.”

Glasnow, 26, only made 12 starts during the regular season due to a flexor strain. Those 12 starts, though, were high quality as he posted a 1.78 ERA with 76 strikeouts and 14 walks across 60 2/3 innings. He certainly had the ability to shut down the Astros on Thursday night.

Media types will no doubt ask Glasnow and the Rays’ staff if the right-hander was indeed tipping his pitches, so we should know soon enough.

Update: And there it is.

Scott Boras to pay salaries of released minor league clients

Scott Boras
Michael Reaves/Getty Images
2 Comments

Across the league, scores of minor leaguers have been released in recent days. Already overworked and underpaid, these players are now left without any kind of reliable income during a pandemic, and during a time of civil unrest.

Jon Heyman reports that agent Scott Boras will pay the salaries of his minor league clients who were among those released. It’s a great and much-needed gesture. Boras described the releases as “completely unanticipated.”

Boras, of course, is perhaps the most successful sports agent of all time, so he and his company can afford to do this. That being said, it should be incumbent on the players’ teams — not their agents or their teammates — to take care of them in a time of crisis. Boras is, effectively, subsidizing the billionaire owners’ thriftiness.