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Gerrit Cole second-fastest to 200 strikeouts in a season

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Astros starter Gerrit Cole dominated the Athletics on Monday night, limiting them to one run on two hits and a walk while striking out 11. It marked his 12th start out of 22 this season with double-digit strikeouts, giving him 205 total on the season.

It is no surprise, then, to hear that Cole is the second-fastest in baseball history to reach 200 strikeouts in a season, per MLB.com’s Brian McTaggart. Cole got there in 133 1/3 innings. The only pitcher faster than Cole was Randy Johnson, who reached 200 K’s in 130 2/3 innings back in 2001 with the Diamondbacks.

Along with the 205 strikeouts, Cole holds an 11-5 record with a 3.03 ERA across 136 2/3 innings. Among qualified starters in the American League, only Charlie Morton (2.61), Mike Minor (2.86), José Berríos (2.96), and teammate Justin Verlander (2.99) have a better ERA than Cole, who has twice finished in the top-five in Cy Young Award voting.

Nationals award World Series shares to scouts and minor league personnel

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports some good news: the Nationals have chosen to include scouts and minor league personnel as part of the group receiving World Series shares for the 2019 season. Manager Dave Martinez said it’s the first time he’s heard of such a thing happening.

The full postseason shares were announced last month. The Nationals players’ pool was in excess of $29 million. Obviously, adding such a large group of people reduces the average share for everyone else, but it is a significant bonus for the scouts and minor league personnel. We have noted many times here that an unnecessarily high percentage of minor leaguers — as well as many ancillary workers for minor league teams — don’t make a living wage. This bonus could mean someone is able to make rent, buy groceries, or buy their kids holiday gifts.

Really classy move on the Nationals’ part. Hopefully it becomes standard practice. Or, better yet, hopefully it becomes standard practice to simply pay minor leaguers and associated staff a fair wage.