Getty Images

Theo Epstein: ‘Ton of change is in order’ if Cubs don’t turn it around

29 Comments

The Washington Nationals began June in an awful place. Everyone was freaking out and everyone assumed that their manager would be fired. They were the top choice in everyone’s “biggest busts of 2019” list.

They have a better record than the Chicago Cubs do right now. Heck, the Cubs are tied with the White Sox in the loss column.

Which sort of explains Theo Epstein taking about making big changes soon if things don’t shape up on the north side. Here he was on Chicago’s on 670 The Score yesterday:

“If we don’t snap out of this, a lot of change is called for, that’s obvious . . . We’re all really frustrated, obviously. It’s a stretch of play that nobody is proud of, nor should anybody be. It’s hard. But you find out a lot about what people are made of during stretches like these. It obviously can’t continue. It’s not acceptable  . . . if this stretch of bad play continues, then certainly a ton of change is in order.”

Of course, as Patrick Mooney points out in his column about all of this, the Cubs remain only a game out of first place in the NL Central thanks to the Brewers and Cardinals putting up equally disappointing showings thus far. If the Cubs played in the NL East they’d be six back. If they played in the West they’d be 13.5 back. In the National League they’re in a virtual tie with Washington for the second Wild Card but in the AL they’d be looking up at five teams ahead of them for the Wild Card.

So, yeah, not ideal.

What kind of big changes might Epstein be thinking about if the Cubs can’t snap out of it? Mooney talks about dealing off bullpen parts such as Steve Cishek, Pedro Strop and Brandon Kintzler, hoping Cole Hamels can get healthy and shopping him and, perhaps, canning their lame duck manager, Joe Maddon, as they look to re-load for 2020.

That’d be quite the thing given this team’s expectations. It’d be even more of a thing if the Cubs, Brewers and Cardinals all continue to struggle and Epstein sees and opportunity to improve with those kinds of deals even while there’s a realistic chance to make the playoffs. The question — which I doubt Epstein would answer right now but which he no doubt has to consider — is whether it’s better to limp into the playoffs, clearly inferior to the Dodgers, Braves and other NL contenders, or if it’s better to try to re-jigger things for next year.

Which is to say: would Theo do a white-flag trade?

 

Red Sox place Chris Sale on 10-day injured list

Chris Sale
Getty Images
Leave a comment

Red Sox left-hander Chris Sale has been placed on the 10-day injured list with left elbow inflammation, the club revealed Saturday. The assignment is retroactive to August 14. In a corresponding roster move, right-handed reliever Ryan Brasier was recalled from Triple-A Pawtucket.

It’s an alarming development for the 30-year-old ace, who has been remarkably injury-free after dealing with a lingering case of shoulder inflammation last summer. While he hasn’t replicated the career-high results he delivered over the last two seasons, he still leads Red Sox pitchers with 3.6 fWAR and will head to the IL with a 6-11 record in 25 starts, a 4.40 ERA, 2.3 BB/9, and league-best 13.3 SO/9 through 147 1/3 innings. A timetable has not been given for his return, nor has the severity of his injury been disclosed. Per Red Sox president Dave Dombrowski, Sale has been experiencing pain in his elbow since Wednesday and will undergo further evaluation in the days to come.

Brasier, 31, was optioned to Triple-A Pawtucket in mid-July after pitching to mixed results in the majors. He currently holds a 4.46 ERA, 2.7 BB/9, and 8.0 SO/9 with the Red Sox, though his results in Triple-A — one run, one walk, and 13 strikeouts over 9 1/3 innings — suggest that he might be capable of even sharper results when he rejoins the big league club.