Christian Yelich
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Video: Christian Yelich belts league-best 20th home run

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It’s been a good week for multitalented Brewers slugger Christian Yelich, who showed off his beer chugging capabilities during a Bucks game on Thursday night, then returned to dominate the baseball sphere on Friday with his 20th home run of the season.

In the third inning, Yelich worked a full count against Phillies right-hander Jerad Eickoff, finally letting loose on a 91.1-m.p.h. fastball that dipped into the right field corner to help the Brewers snap a 2-2 tie:

According to MLB Stats, the 27-year-old outfielder reached the 20-homer threshold in the fewest number of team games since Josh Hamilton did it for the Rangers in 2012. Friday’s blast also marked the third such hit he’s recorded against the Phillies in the last two weeks alone, following two home runs off of Edgar García and Zach Eflin during the club’s last road trip.

Entering Friday’s opener, Yelich held a .325/.440/.732 batting line with 19 homers, nine stolen bases, and a 1.172 OPS through 191 plate appearances. While he was held out for the majority of the week’s games due to a mild case of back spasms, he appears to have made a full recovery.

The Brewers currently lead the Phillies 4-3 in the fourth.

Minor League Baseball accuses MLB of making misleading statements

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Yesterday several members of Congress, calling themselves the “Save Minor League Baseball Task Force,” introduced a resolution saying that Major League Baseball should drop its plan to eliminate the minor league clubs and, rather, maintain the current minor league structure. In response, Major League Baseball issued a statement accusing Minor League Baseball of refusing to negotiate and imploring Congress to prod Minor League Baseball back to the bargaining table.

Only one problem with that: according to Minor League Baseball, it has been at the table. And, in a new statement today, claims that MLB is making knowingly false statements about all of that and engaging in bad faith:

“Minor League Baseball was encouraged by the dialogue in a recent meeting between representatives of Minor League Baseball and Major League Baseball and a commitment by both sides to engage further on February 20. However, Major League Baseball’s claims that Minor League Baseball is not participating in these negotiations in a constructive and productive manner is false. Minor League Baseball has provided Major League Baseball with numerous substantive proposals that would improve the working conditions for Minor League Baseball players by working with MLB to ensure adequate facilities and reasonable travel. Unfortunately, Major League Baseball continues to misrepresent our positions with misleading information in public statements that are not conducive to good faith negotiations.”

I suppose Rob Manfred’s next statement is either going to double down or, alternatively, he’s going to say “wait, you were at the airport Marriott? We thought the meeting was at the downtown Marriott! Oh, so you were at the table. Our bad!”

Minor League Baseball is not merely offering dueling statements, however. A few minutes ago it released a letter it had sent to Rob Manfred six days ago, the entirely of which can be read here. It certainly suggests that, contrary to Manfred’s claim yesterday, Minor League Baseball is, in fact, attempting to engage Major League Baseball on the issues.

In the letter, the Minor League Baseball Negotiating Committee said it, “is singularly focused on working with MLB to reach an agreement that will best ensure that baseball remains the National Pastime in communities large and small throughout our
country,” and that to that end it seeks to “set forth with clarity in a letter to you the position of MiLB on the key issues that we must resolve in these negotiations.”

From there the letter goes through the various issues Major League Baseball has put on the table, including the status of the full season and short season leagues which are on the chopping block, and implores MLB not to, as proposed, eliminate the Appalachian League. It blasts MLB’s concept of “The Dream League” — the bucket into which MLB proposes to throw all newly-unaffiliated clubs — as a “seriously flawed concept,” and strongly counters the talking point Major League Baseball has offered about how it allegedly “subsidizes” the minor leagues:

It is simply not true that MLB “heavily subsidizes” MiLB. MLB teams do not pay MiLB owners and their partner communities that supply the facilities and league infrastructure that enable players under contract to MLB teams the opportunity to compete at a high level and establish whether they have the capability to play in the Major Leagues. MLB just pays its OWN player/employees and other costs directly related to their development. MLB does not fund or subsidize MiLB’s business operations in any form and, in fact, the amounts funded by MiLB to assist in the development of MLB’s players far exceed anything paid by MLB to its players, managers, or coaches at the Minor League level. Through the payment of a ticket tax to MLB, it is arguable that MiLB is paying a subsidy to MLB. Either way, talk about subsidies isn’t helpful or beneficial to the industry. The fact is that we are business partners working together to grow the game, entertain fans, and develop future MLB players.

You should read the whole letter. And Rob Manfred should probably stop issuing statements that, it would appear, are easily countered.