And That Happened: Tuesday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Yankees 11, Orioles 4: New York batters were not terribly intimidated by O’s starter David Hess, touching him for nine runs on eight hits — three of which were dingers — and walking four times in five innings. Clint Frazier hit two of the bombs and knocked in five runs. Gary Sánchez swatted a three-run homer. The Yankees have already played ten games against Baltimore this year. They are 8-2 against them and have outscored them 73-40. Oh, and Frazier’s three-run homer last night was the 100th one Baltimore pitchers have allowed on the year, putting them on pace to obliterate the single-season record for team homers given up.

And if anyone complains about the schedule having New York play Baltimore so much early I’m gonna get cranky. One of the beauties of baseball is that, at least in a division, everyone plays everyone more or less the same amount of times and there are so many damn games overall that schedule differences are so small as to be insignificant. If you wanna beef about schedules — maybe the most boring and kind of pathetic beef in sports fandom — take it to the college football page.

Blue Jays 10, Red Sox 3: Rowdy Tellez who, with a name like that, should be a character in a Hollywood western as opposed to a 1B/DH, hit two homers — a two-run shot and a three-run shot — to lead the Blue Jays attached. Both of them came against Eduardo Rodríguez, who is a lefty. Tellez is a lefty too who, as Laura Armstrong of the Toronto Star wrote on Sunday, had been used almost exclusively against right-handed pitching until recently. Charlie Montoyo has changed his mind on that, she reported, allowing Tellez to face southpaws and it’s been paying off. Definitely paid off last night. What kind of great timing was that by Armstrong and The Star? Nice work!

Astros 5, White Sox 1: Justin Verlander took a no-hitter into the seventh before José Abreu broke it up with a homer. He’d end up going eight, allowing just that homer, while striking out 12. Probably shouldn’t have been surprised by that homer, though. Abreu has, somehow, owned Verlander over the years. Entering last night’s game he was hitting .366/.435/.780 with five homers and two doubles off of him in 46 plate appearances.

Marlins 5, Tigers 4: Chris Wallach doubled in a run in the second and doubled in a run in the 11th. The one in the 11th ended up winning the game and gets more ink devoted to it, but if not for the one in the second he doesn’t have a change to hit that one in the 11th, right? It’s like time travel paradoxes and all of that jazz. If it helps, think of the 11th inning double as Thanos snapping his fingers and the second inning double as him acquiring the Infinity Stones. If the Tigers develop a time machine and want to stop him, they’re way better off going back to the second inning is what I’m saying.

[Editor: the movie has been out for almost a month. You can stop now, OK? Maybe a more timely reference? Just suggesting.]

As I was saying, that’s why Marty McFly couldn’t just leave 1955. He had to get his parents to dance together first.

The Marlins have won four in a row. I suspect some sort of supernatural cause of that with time travel possibly playing a part.

Athletics 5, Indians 3: Trevor Bauer continues to struggle of late. Here he gave up a pinch-hit homer to Mark Canha in the third to give the A’s a lead they’d not surrender. Bauer walked in a run with the bases loaded in the second and allowed four runs, walked four and hit three batters in six innings on the night. Not that things are rosy for the A’s. The reason Canha was pinch-hitting in the first place is because Khris Davis had to leave the game due to continued problems with a sore hip which, after the game, landed him on the injured list.

Cubs 3, Phillies 2: Andrew McCutchen gave Philly a 2-1 lead with a two-run single in the seventh but a ninth inning rally capped by a walkoff RBI single from pinch hitter Javier Báez gave the Cubs the win. The first run in the rally came when Kris Bryant scored from third on an Albert Almora Jr. chopper by motoring home to beat a play at the plate. He hauled butt from second to score on a groundout earlier in the game, so it was all wheels for him. Bryce Harper went 0-for-4 but he did this too, so let’s call the night even for him:

Mets 6, Nationals 5: Stop me if you’ve heard this one before, but the Nats blew a late lead. Two actually. Up 3-1 in the seventh, J.D. Davis hit a three-run pinch-hit homer to give New York a 4-3 lead. Washington took the lead back in the eighth thanks to RBI doubles from Trea Turner and Juan Soto, but the lead was blown again when Pete Alonso hit his 16th dinger on the season in the bottom half. The Mets won it on a walkoff infield single from Ahmed Rosario in the bottom of the ninth. Here’s the highlight package of both the homer and the walkoff. Fast forward to the Rosario hit and watch him haul it down to first base to beat that throw. That’s some serious hustle:

Giants 4, Braves 3: It was a big night for walkoff singles, eh? The Cubs, the Mets and Giants all did it. Here Joe Panik did the honors, knocking in two to end the game and completing a big comeback for the Giants who were down 3-1 entering the bottom of the ninth. Before Panik’s single Kevin Pillar knocked one in and a couple of stolen bases put the runners in position to score. All three runs and both stolen bases came against Braves reliever Luke Jackson. It was Jackson’s fourth blown save of the year. Don’t worry, though, Braves fans. The team’s decision to put more money in real estate development than the bullpen may be highly annoying, but it continues to pay off financially and has the glide slope and all of that looking A-OK.

Rockies 5, Pirates 0: Germán Márquez was stellar, tossing eight shutout innings, allowing only three hits and striking out seven. He also — all together now — helped his own cause by knocking in a run with a single in the eighth. A Trevor Story homer and a two-run triple from Charlie Blackmon helped his cause earlier.

Dodgers 7, Rays 3: This game featured ten total runs, none of which scored on a homer. Someone had better alert the league office because I’m sure there’s some kind of rule against that now. Clayton Kershaw took a shutout into the seventh and ended up allowing two runs before leaving to pick up his fourth win against no losses. He has not been the dominant Kershaw of old of late but the Dodgers have won the last 15 regular season games he has started. It’s a cliche, but that “he gives us a chance to win” stuff matters. L.A. has won six of seven.

Reds 3, Brewers 0: Sony Gray tossed six shutout innings, striking out nine, and the pen handled the final three frames, striking out five more. Cincinnati scored all three of its runs in the first off of starter Gio Gonzalez: one by wild pitch, one by a double and one by a fielder’s choice.

Rangers 5, Mariners 3: Lance Lynn allowed two runs over seven innings, striking out 11. Nomar Mazara had three hits, an RBI and Joey Gallo hit a two-run shot. The Rangers have won six of their last seven games and are now at .500.

Twins 8, Angels 3: Marwin Gonzalez homered and drove in three. His two-run jack in the sixth tied the game and then the Twinkies put up a four-run seventh to put the game out of reach. The Twins have won five of six and own a seven-game lead in the AL Central.

Padres 3, Diamondbacks 2: Eric Hosmer hit a two-run, homer off Greinke in the Padres’ three-run sixth inning. Greinke had been tossing a one-hit shutout before that and had recorded his 2,500th career strikeout earlier. Way to rain on the guy’s parade. San Diego is a game over .500 now. The Snakes have lost four straight.

Royals vs. Cardinals — POSTPONED:

The sun is out, the sky is blue
There’s not a cloud to spoil the view
But it’s raining, raining in my heart
The weatherman says clear today
He doesn’t know you’ve gone away
And it’s raining, raining in my heart
Oh, misery, misery
What’s gonna become of me?
I tell my blues they mustn’t show
But soon these tears are bound to flow
‘Cause it’s raining, raining in my heart
But it’s raining, raining in my heart
And it’s raining, raining in my heart

Texas Rangers ink free-agent ace Jacob deGrom to 5-year deal

Jacob deGrom
USA Today
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ARLINGTON, Texas — Jacob deGrom is headed to the free-spending Texas Rangers, who believe the health risk is worth the potential reward in trying to end a six-year run of losing.

The two-time Cy Young Award winner agreed to a $185 million, five-year contract Friday, leaving the New York Mets after nine seasons – the past two shortened substantially by injuries.

“We acknowledge the risk, but we also acknowledge that in order to get great players, there is a risk and a cost associated with that,” Rangers general manager Chris Young said. “And one we feel like is worth taking with a player of Jacob’s caliber.”

Texas announced the signing after the 34-year-old deGrom passed his physical. A person with direct knowledge of the deal disclosed the financial terms to The Associated Press. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the club did not announce those details.

The Rangers were also big spenders in free agency last offseason, signing shortstop Corey Seager ($325 million, 10 years) and second baseman Marcus Semien ($175 million, seven years).

The team said deGrom will be introduced in a news conference at Globe Life Field next week following the winter meetings in San Diego.

“It fits in so many ways in terms of what we need,” Young said. “He’s a tremendous person. I have a number of close friends and teammates who played with Jacob and love him. I think he’s going to be just a perfect fit for our clubhouse and our fans.”

Texas had modest expectations after adding Seager, Semien and starter Jon Gray ($56 million, four years) last offseason but still fell short of them.

The Rangers went 68-94, firing manager Chris Woodward during the season, and then hired Bruce Bochy, a three-time World Series champion with San Francisco. Texas’ six straight losing seasons are its worst skid since the franchise moved from Washington in 1972.

Rangers owner Ray Davis said the club wouldn’t hesitate to keep adding payroll. Including the $19.65 million qualifying offer accepted by Martin Perez, the team’s best pitcher last season, the Rangers have spent nearly $761 million in free agency over the past year.

“I hate losing, but I think there’s one person in our organization who hates losing worse than me, and I think it’s Ray Davis,” Young said. “He’s tired of losing. I’m tired of losing. Our organization is tired of losing.”

After making his first start in early August last season, deGrom went 5-4 with a 3.08 ERA in 11 outings. He helped the Mets reach the playoffs, then passed up a $30.5 million salary for 2023 and opted out of his contract to become a free agent for the first time.

That ended his deal with the Mets at $107 million over four years, and deGrom rejected their $19.65 million qualifying offer in November. New York will receive draft-pick compensation for losing him.

The fan favorite becomes the latest in a long line of ace pitchers to leave the Mets for one reason or another, including Nolan Ryan, Tom Seaver, Dwight Gooden and David Cone.

The Rangers visit Citi Field from Aug. 28-30.

When healthy, deGrom is perhaps baseball’s most dominant pitcher. His 2.52 career ERA ranks third in the expansion era (since 1961) behind Los Angeles Dodgers lefty Clayton Kershaw (2.48) and Hall of Famer Sandy Koufax (2.19) among those with at least 200 starts.

The right-hander is 4-1 with a 2.90 ERA in five career postseason starts, including a win over San Diego in the wild-card round this year that extended the Mets’ season. New York was eliminated the next night.

A four-time All-Star and the 2014 NL Rookie of the Year, deGrom was a ninth-round draft pick by the Mets in 2010 out of Stetson, where he played shortstop before moving to the mound. He was slowed by Tommy John surgery early in his career and didn’t reach the majors until age 26.

Once he arrived, though, he blossomed. He helped the Mets reach the 2015 World Series and earn a 2016 playoff berth before winning consecutive NL Cy Young Awards in 2018 and 2019.

But injuries to his elbow, forearm and shoulder blade have limited him to 26 starts over the past two seasons. He compiled a career-low 1.08 ERA over 92 innings in 2021, but did not pitch after July 7 that year because of arm trouble.

DeGrom is 82-57 with 1,607 strikeouts in 1,326 innings over nine big league seasons. He gets $30 million next year, $40 million in 2024 and 2025, $38 million in 2026 and $37 million in 2027. The deal includes a conditional option for 2028 with no guaranteed money.

The addition of deGrom gives the Rangers three proven starters along with Gray and Perez, who went 12-8 with a career-best 2.89 ERA in his return to the team that signed him as a teenager out of Venezuela. Young didn’t rule out the addition of another starter.

With several holes on their starting staff, the Mets have shown interest in free agents Justin Verlander and Carlos Rodon to pair with 38-year-old Max Scherzer atop the rotation.

Now, with deGrom gone, signing one of those two could become a much bigger priority.