Mike Trout
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Video: Mike Trout swats his 250th career home run

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Angels slugger Mike Trout passed a significant career milestone on Saturday, clubbing his 10th home run of the year — and the 250th of his career — off of the Royals’ Jakob Junis in the first inning of the team’s eventual 6-3 win.

The blast, a one-out solo shot to the center field bullpen, was delivered on a 2-2 fastball and registered a projected 473 feet — just four feet shy of Trout’s all-time best mark in the Statcast era.

With his 250th career homer, Trout was added to an exclusive list of American League sluggers who reached that total before their 28th birthdays, becoming the first to do it in nearly two decades. The club of young home run hitters currently includes Jimmie Foxx (who reached the mark in 1934), Mickey Mantle (1959), Juan González (1997), Ken Griffey Jr. (1997), and Álex Rodríguez (2002).

As expected, it’s been another strong year for the seven-time All-Star and two-time MVP: Through Saturday’s performance, he’s batting .297/.468/.580 with 10 homers, 27 RBI, six stolen bases (in seven chances), and a 1.047 OPS across 186 plate appearances in 2019.

Propelled in part by Trout’s record-setting home run, as well as Shohei Ohtani‘s first homer of 2019, a Kole Calhoun sac fly, and a Jonathan Lucroy RBI double, the Angels clinched a 6-3 win over the Royals to position themselves for the sweep. They’ll face off against southpaw Danny Duffy for the series finale on Sunday at 4:07 PM EDT.

Cubs, Red Sox, Yankees exceeded competitive balance tax threshold in 2019

Matt Stone/MediaNews Group/Boston Herald
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Jorge Castillo of the Los Angeles Times reports that the Cubs, Red Sox, and Yankees exceeded the competitive balance tax (more colloquially known as the luxury tax) threshold for the 2019 season, set at $206 million. It will rise to $208 million for the 2020 season and $210 million in 2021.

Teams that exceed the CBT threshold pay a penalty on the overage, which is compounded depending on how consistently they have exceeded the threshold. The base penalty is 20 percent. If a team has exceeded it in a second consecutive year, the penalty rises to 30 percent. Three or more consecutive seasons yields a 50 percent tax on the overage. Furthermore, teams that exceed the CBT threshold by $20-40 million see an additional 12 percent tax. Above $40 million brings a 42.5 percent penalty which rises to 45 percent if the team exceeds the CBT by more than $40 million in a consecutive year.

The luxury tax has acted as a de facto salary cap. Front offices typically have gone out of their way not to exceed it, especially in recent years. The Cubs, Red Sox, and Yankees are each widely believed to be looking to stay below $208 million in 2020.

In pursuit of payroll efficiency, the Cubs are believed to be willing to listen to offers for catcher Willson Contreras, third baseman Kris Bryant, outfielders Kyle Scharber, Albert Almora, and Ian Happ, as well as pitcher José Quintana. The Red Sox are believed to be pursuing trades of outfielder Mookie Betts and/or J.D. Martinez. Outfielder Jackie Bradley Jr. is also believed to be available.

As we have been discussing the ongoing labor tension in baseball lately, one wonders if the CBT threshold might also be changed within the next collective bargaining agreement. It has served ownership well, giving them something to point at as a reason not to invest as much into putting together a competitive and entertaining product for fans.