Jonny Venters
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Braves release Jonny Venters

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The Braves have released longtime lefty reliever Jonny Venters, per a team announcement on Saturday. In a corresponding move, they selected the contract of fellow left-hander Jerry Blevins. Blevins is expected to be available for the remainder of the Braves’ series against the Brewers this weekend.

Venters, 34, came up with the Braves in 2010. He reached All-Star status with the club in 2011, but multiple ulnar collateral ligament injuries (and subsequent Tommy John surgeries) compromised his ability to stay consistent and productive in the bullpen.

Following a prolonged six-year absence from the majors, he made his comeback with the Rays in 2018 and pitched to a 3.86 ERA over several dozen appearances before he was flipped back to the Braves prior to the trade deadline. He finished the season with a collective 3.67 ERA, 4.2 BB/9, and 7.1 SO/9 over 34 1/3 innings and earned a Comeback Player of the Year Award alongside the Red Sox’ David Price.

Things didn’t go nearly so smoothly for the southpaw in 2019. Hampered by a calf strain, Venters missed most of the first month of the season and has allowed 13 runs, eight walks, and struck out seven of 31 batters across just 4 2/3 innings of work. Given his strong performance last year, however, there’s a chance he’ll pick up another major-league contract well before the end of this season.

Rob Manfred walks back comment about 60-game season

Rob Manfred
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Yesterday, on The Dan Patrick Show, commissioner Rob Manfred stuck his foot in his mouth concerning negotiations with the MLB Players Association, saying, “We weren’t going to play more than 60 games.” The comment was taken poorly because MLB owners, represented by Manfred, and the MLBPA were engaged in protracted negotiations in May and June over the 2020 season. Ultimately they couldn’t come to terms, so Manfred had to set the season as prescribed by the March agreement. In saying, “We weren’t going to play more than 60 games,” Manfred appeared to be in violation of the March agreement, which said the league must use the “best efforts to play as many games as possible.” It also seemed to indicate the owners were negotiating in bad faith with the players.

Per Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY, Manfred walked back his comment on Thursday. Manfred said, “My point was that no matter what happened with the union, the way things unfolded with the second [coronavirus] spike, we would have ended up with only time for 60 games, anyway. As time went on, it became clearer and clearer that the course of the virus was going to dictate how many games we could play.” Manfred added, “As it turned out, the reality was there was only time to play 60 games. If we had started an 82-game season [beginning July 1], we would have had people in Arizona and Florida the time the second spike hit.”

As mentioned yesterday, it is important to view Manfred’s comments through the lens that he represents the owners. The owners wanted a shorter season with the playoffs beginning on time (they also wanted expanded playoffs) because, without fans, they will be making most of their money this year through playoff television revenue. Some thought the owners’ offers to the union represented stall tactics, designed to drag out negotiations as long as possible. Thus, the season begins later, reducing the possible number of regular season games that could be played. In other words, the owners used the virus to their advantage.

Manfred wants the benefit of the doubt with the way fans and the media interpreted his comment, but I’m not so sure he has earned it. This isn’t the first time Manfred has miscommunicated with regard to negotiations. He told the media last month that he had a deal with the union when, in fact, no such deal existed. The MLBPA had to put out a public statement refuting the claim. Before that, Manfred did a complete 180 on the 2020 season, saying on June 10 that there would “100%” be a season. Five days later, he said he was “not confident” there would be a 2020 season. Some have interpreted Manfred’s past comments as a way to galvanize or entice certain owners, who might not have been on the same page about resuming play. There’s a layer beneath the surface to which fans and, to a large extent, the media are not privy.

The likely scenario is that Manfred veered a bit off-script yesterday, realized he gave the union fodder for a grievance, and rushed out to play damage control.