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Trump takes credit for Red Sox sweeping Mariners

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As I mentioned in the recaps this morning, the Mariners are a bad team that started off hot and is now finding its level. As I also mentioned in the recaps this morning, the Red Sox are a good team that started off poorly and is now finding its level. As such, one should not be terribly surprised that Seattle came to Fenway Park this past weekend and got swept by Boston in pretty resounding fashion.

Of course, there are some others who have a different explanation for why the Red Sox swept the series:

I suppose that’s one possibility.

Another possibility is that the president is — shockingly — engaging in some fallacious correlation/causation reasoning.

I mean, Hector Velázquez skipped the White House visit because he took specific issue with Trump’s comments about his native Mexico and he tossed five innings of two-run ball and got the win yesterday. Maybe his snubbing of Trump was what gave him his best outing of the season. Rafael Devers went 9-for-14 with a homer, a couple of doubles and seven RBI over the weekend after giving Trump a pass. Xander Bogaerts went 4-for-10 with three RBI on the weekend after skipping out. Alex Cora, of course, managed the Sox to all three of those wins despite his decision to avoid a meeting with Trump.

I’m joking of course. There is no correlation or causation to be found here, whether the player in question went to the White House or not, because visiting a politician — or choosing not to visit a politician — in no way impacts one’s baseball performance. To suggest otherwise is either (a) to be silly; or (b) to be cynically using a non-political actor, like a popular sports team, as a political prop in order to bathe in unearned glory and to make oneself look or feel better.

Which is, actually, a pretty good reason for a sports team that has no desire to be cast in a political light to go see said politician.

Rumor: MLB execs discussing 100-game season that would begin July 1

David Price and Mookie Betts
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Matt Spiegel of 670 The Score Chicago heard from a source that Major League Baseball executives have been discussing a 100-game season that would begin on July 1 and conclude on October 15. It would essentially pick up the second half schedule, eliminating the All-Star Game while hosting the World Series at a neutral warm-weather stadium — ideally Dodger Stadium.

In the event the Dodgers, who won 106 games last year, made it all the way through the playoffs, the World Series would be hosted in Anaheim or San Diego. The earlier rounds of the playoffs would be played in the cities of the teams involved, which might be tough since the postseason would extend into November.

Spiegel went on to describe this vision as “an absolute best case scenario,” and that’s accurate. In order for the regular season to begin on July 1, the players would need to have several weeks if not a full month prior to get back into playing shape — more or less an abbreviated second spring training. And that would mean the U.S. having made significant progress against the virus by way of herd immunity or a vaccine, which would allow for nonessential businesses to resume operations. The U.S., sadly, is faring not so well compared to other nations around the world for a variety of reasons, but all of which point to a return to normalcy by the summer seeming rather unlikely.

Regardless, the league does have to plan for the potential of being able to start the regular season this summer just in case things really do break right and offer that opportunity. Commissioner Rob Manfred has stated multiple times about the league’s need to be creative, referring to ideas like playing deep into the fall, changing up the location of games, playing without fans in attendance, etc. This rumor certainly fits the “creative” mold.