Ryan Braun
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Ryan Braun delivers six hits in historic 18-inning game

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The Brewers and Mets battled for 18 long innings on Saturday night, setting an all-time record for the longest game (by innings) in Miller Park history. For the majority of the game’s five-hour, 22-minute runtime, they traded goose eggs on the scoreboard — thanks to eight consecutive scoreless innings from the Mets’ bullpen, and 14 from the Brewers’ — until Ryan Braun won it in the bottom of the 18th with a walk-off two-run single that just slipped between Pete Alonso and Robinson Canó:

The hit not only propelled the Brewers to a hard-earned victory, but represented a career high for Braun as well. It was his sixth hit of the night, preceded by base hits in the fourth, sixth, and ninth, and two doubles in the 14th and 17th. (Funnily enough, it was also a historic night for the Miller Park racing sausages, who came out to entertain the remaining members of the 39,565-person crowd on three separate occasions.)

While both a triple and home run evaded him for the cycle, he’s the first MLB player to collect six hits in a single game since his teammate and former NL MVP, Christian Yelich, did so in a 10-inning win for the Brewers last August. According to Baseball Reference, Braun hadn’t delivered as many as five hits in a game since 2010.

After an exhausting night of weird baseball — during which, it should be said, both teams depleted their benches of reserve players — the Brewers and Mets will go toe-to-toe again on Sunday for the series finale. Milwaukee right-hander Zach Davies is currently positioned to go for the sweep against lefty Jason Vargas at 2:10 PM EDT.

Mets are interested in Rick Porcello

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Jon Heyman reports that the Mets are interested in free agent pitcher Rick Porcello and have been speaking to his agent.

Porcello is coming off a pretty dreadful 2019 season in which he went 14-12 with a 5.52 ERA in 32 starts. That ERA was the worst in the majors among qualified starters. He’s also pretty homer happy. But (a) he’s durable; and (b) a change of scenery and a move to a more pitcher-friendly division and park might do him some good, so it’s not like he’s a bad guy for the Mets to be looking at. He’s only going to be 31 next season and he’s just a year removed from a decent season.

There are far worse bounceback candidates.