Report: Jake Peavy retires

Jake Peavy
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Right-hander Jake Peavy has retired from Major League Baseball, per recent reports from Scott Miller of Bleacher Report and Peter Abraham of the Boston Globe. Peavy told Miller that he has abandoned any comeback plans in 2019, though it looks like he still intends to be involved in baseball at some point.

It’s been nearly three years since the 37-year-old righty made any kind of official appearance in the majors. After getting his start with the Padres in 2002, he played multi-season gigs with the White Sox, Red Sox, and Giants, compiling a cumulative 3.63 ERA, 2,207 strikeouts, and 44.1 fWAR across 15 years in the league. His most memorable performance came during the Padres’ 2007 campaign, when he commanded a 19-6 record with a league-best 2.54 ERA, 240 strikeouts, and a 2.84 FIP through 223 1/3 innings — numbers so crisp that they merited a second career All-Star nomination, seventh place in NL MVP voting, and Peavy’s first and only NL Cy Young Award.

In the decade that followed those accolades, however, Peavy struggled to sustain that kind of dominance on the mound. During his 2010 run with the White Sox, he tore his right latissimus dorsi tendon completely off the bone and had just made a full recovery when he went back on the injured list with a rotator cuff injury. His last several seasons were marked by further injuries — a fractured rib, a severe laceration to his non-pitching hand, a lingering back strain — and despite two World Series runs with the 2013 Red Sox and 2014 Giants, he ended his time in MLB with some career-worst numbers: a 5.54 ERA, 2.7 BB/9, 7.7 SO/9, and 0.7 fWAR through 118 2/3 innings in San Francisco.

Last May, after a year’s absence from the majors and some intense personal issues, Peavy told reporters that he had regained full mobility in his arm and intended to pitch again during the 2018 season. No teams ended up nabbing the veteran starter, however. Now, as Miller reported Friday, it looks as though he’ll focus on family responsibilities instead.

MLB, union resume blood testing after pandemic, lockout

Scott Taetsch-USA TODAY Sports
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NEW YORK – In the first acknowledgment that MLB and the players’ association resumed blood testing for human growth hormone, the organizations said none of the 1,027 samples taken during the 2022 season tested positive.

HGH testing stopped in 2021 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Testing also was halted during the 99-day lockout that ended in mid-March, and there were supply chain issues due to COVID-19 and additional caution in testing due to coronavirus protocols.

The annual public report is issued by Thomas M. Martin, independent program administrator of MLB’s joint drug prevention and treatment program. In an announcement accompanying Thursday’s report, MLB and the union said test processing is moving form the INRS Laboratory in Quebec, Canada, to the UCLA Laboratory in California.

MLB tests for HGH using dried blood spot testing, which was a change that was agreed to during bargaining last winter. There were far fewer samples taken in 2022 compared to 2019, when there were 2,287 samples were collected – none positive.

Beyond HGH testing, 9,011 urine samples were collected in the year ending with the 2022 World Series, up from 8,436 in the previous year but down from 9,332 in 2019. And therapeutic use exemptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder dropped for the ninth straight year, with just 72 exemptions in 2022.

Overall, the league issued six suspensions in 2022 for performance-enhancing substances: three for Boldenone (outfielder/first baseman Danny Santana, pitcher Richard Rodriguez and infielder Jose Rondon, all free agents, for 80 games apiece); one each for Clomiphene (Milwaukee catcher Pedro Severino for 80 games), Clostebol (San Diego shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. for 80 games) and Stanozolol (Milwaukee pitcher J.C. Mejia for 80 games).

There was an additional positive test for the banned stimulant Clobenzorex. A first positive test for a banned stimulant results in follow-up testing with no suspension.