Smash Mouth smack-talked Bryce Harper on Twitter

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Smash Mouth frontman Steve Harwell has ostensibly tweeted about baseball from his band’s official Twitter account on more than one occasion. Back in 2016, he got into a back-and-forth with the official Twitter of the Athletics. More recently, Harwell appeared to have some inside information as the Bryce Harper sweepstakes reached its final stage, which was somewhat verified by Alex Pavlovic of NBC Sports Bay Area.

Harper since signed a 13-year, $330 million contract with the Phillies. Things have mostly gone well for him so far, as he’s carrying an .848 OPS with six homers and 20 RBI. He’s wildly popular. The only blip on the radar was a brief booing by the home crowd during a team-wide lackluster performance against the Tigers on Tuesday.

The official Smash Mouth Twitter posted this:

The best response — and the only necessary response — to this tweet that I saw came from @killakow, who wrote, “Did you not … tell All-Stars to get paid?” Indeed, that’s the fourth line in the chorus to the band’s most popular song, “All Star,” released in 1999.

How hated is Harper in Philly? Harper’s photo booth at the Phillies Phestival — a charity event that raises money in the fight against Lou Gehrig’s Disease — sold out in under two minutes, according to Jay Floyd of the Shore Sports Network. All of those fans will be ironically taking pictures with him and getting his autograph.

MLB, union resume blood testing after pandemic, lockout

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NEW YORK – In the first acknowledgment that MLB and the players’ association resumed blood testing for human growth hormone, the organizations said none of the 1,027 samples taken during the 2022 season tested positive.

HGH testing stopped in 2021 because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Testing also was halted during the 99-day lockout that ended in mid-March, and there were supply chain issues due to COVID-19 and additional caution in testing due to coronavirus protocols.

The annual public report is issued by Thomas M. Martin, independent program administrator of MLB’s joint drug prevention and treatment program. In an announcement accompanying Thursday’s report, MLB and the union said test processing is moving form the INRS Laboratory in Quebec, Canada, to the UCLA Laboratory in California.

MLB tests for HGH using dried blood spot testing, which was a change that was agreed to during bargaining last winter. There were far fewer samples taken in 2022 compared to 2019, when there were 2,287 samples were collected – none positive.

Beyond HGH testing, 9,011 urine samples were collected in the year ending with the 2022 World Series, up from 8,436 in the previous year but down from 9,332 in 2019. And therapeutic use exemptions for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder dropped for the ninth straight year, with just 72 exemptions in 2022.

Overall, the league issued six suspensions in 2022 for performance-enhancing substances: three for Boldenone (outfielder/first baseman Danny Santana, pitcher Richard Rodriguez and infielder Jose Rondon, all free agents, for 80 games apiece); one each for Clomiphene (Milwaukee catcher Pedro Severino for 80 games), Clostebol (San Diego shortstop Fernando Tatis Jr. for 80 games) and Stanozolol (Milwaukee pitcher J.C. Mejia for 80 games).

There was an additional positive test for the banned stimulant Clobenzorex. A first positive test for a banned stimulant results in follow-up testing with no suspension.