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Christian Yelich homers three times, drives in seven runs vs. Cardinals

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Reigning NL MVP Christian Yelich powered the Brewers to a 10-7 win over the Cardinals on Monday night. The outfielder hit a pair of three-run homers and a solo shot, driving in seven runs.

Yelich’s first homer came in the second inning off of Dakota Hudson, capping off a three-run frame for the Brewers to take a 6-2 lead. Yelich broke a 6-6 tie in the sixth with another three-run shot, this time off of Mike Mayers. Yelich tacked on a solo homer in the eighth off of John Brebbia.

Yelich is the first Brewer to hit three homers in a game since Aaron Hill on May 7, 2016 against the Reds. There have now been 21 three-homer games by Brewers hitters. Yelich’s seven RBI matches a club record, achieved 11 other times, most recently by Jesús Aguilar on July 7, 2017 against the Yankees.

There have already been three three-homer games this season. The others came from the Yankees’ Gary Sánchez on April 7 against the Orioles and the Cardinals’ Paul Goldschmidt on March 29 against the Brewers. 2018 saw 14 three-homer games.

Yelich now has eight homers on the season, seven of which have come off of Cardinal pitching. Along with the eight dingers, Yelich is hitting .354/.449/.785 with 22 RBI, 17 runs scored, and three stolen bases in 78 plate appearances.

Yelich’s most generous act actually occurred before Monday’s game, however. He delivered a puppy to two little girls who brought a sign to a Brewers game that read, “Yelich, hit a home run and my dad buys me a puppy!” Yelich, of course, homered in that game. The man does it all.

Mets are interested in Rick Porcello

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Jon Heyman reports that the Mets are interested in free agent pitcher Rick Porcello and have been speaking to his agent.

Porcello is coming off a pretty dreadful 2019 season in which he went 14-12 with a 5.52 ERA in 32 starts. That ERA was the worst in the majors among qualified starters. He’s also pretty homer happy. But (a) he’s durable; and (b) a change of scenery and a move to a more pitcher-friendly division and park might do him some good, so it’s not like he’s a bad guy for the Mets to be looking at. He’s only going to be 31 next season and he’s just a year removed from a decent season.

There are far worse bounceback candidates.