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Every baseball team is worth at least a billion dollars

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Forbes has released its annual team valuation list, along with its team revenue and profitability rankings.

This comes out every April and every April it is worth noting that these figures should be taken with a pretty big grain of salt. At best this is a snapshot, but not much more, because there just isn’t enough data out there for anyone outside of Major League Baseball to know this stuff with the degree to specificity Forbes claims. And, of course, the only people in a position to correct these numbers — the league and the owners themselves — wouldn’t dare reveal what they really make or lose. At the same time, one should also take MLB and owner denials of these numbers with a grain of salt because they all have an interest in not appearing as well-off as they truly are.

With all of that said, the takeaways:

  • For the first time ever, every single franchise is worth at least a billion dollars. The New York Yankees are the most valuable team at $4.6 billion. The Marlins the least at just around $1 billion;
  • The 30 teams generated a record average operating income of $40 million during the 2018 season, which is 38% more than the previous year;
  • Revenue increased 4.8%, to an average of $330 million per team; and
  • Player costs, including signing bonuses and benefits, remained flat at $157 million.

Which is to say: baseball is rolling in it. But you knew that already.

Nationals’ major leaguers to continue offering financial assistance to minor leaguers

Sean Doolittle
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On Sunday, we learned that while the Nationals would continue to pay their minor leaguers throughout the month of June, their weekly stipend would be lowered by 25 percent, from $400 to $300. In an incredible act of solidarity, Nationals reliever Sean Doolittle and his teammates put out a statement, saying they would be covering the missing $100 from the stipends.

After receiving some criticism, the Nationals reversed course, agreeing to pay their minor leaguers their full $400 weekly stipend.

Doolittle and co. have not withdrawn their generosity. On Wednesday, Doolittle released another statement, saying that he and his major league teammates would continue to offer financial assistance to Nationals minor leaguers through the non-profit organization More Than Baseball.

The full statement:

Washington Nationals players were excited to learn that our minor leaguers will continue receiving their full stipends. We are grateful that efforts have been made to restore their pay during these challenging times.

We remain committed to supporting them. Nationals players are partnering with More Than Baseball to contribute funds that will offer further assistance and financial support to any minor leaguers who were in the Nationals organization as of March 1.

We’ll continue to stand with them as we look forward to resuming our 2020 MLB season.

Kudos to Doolittle and the other Nationals continuing to offer a helping hand in a trying time. The players shouldn’t have to subsidize their employers’ labor expenses, but that is the world we live in today.