Giants CEO Larry Baer suspended through July 1

Getty Images
20 Comments

On March 1, San Francisco Giants CEO Baer was caught on video having a loud, public argument with his wife during which he tried to rip a cell phone out of her hands, which caused her to tumble off of her chair and to the ground as she screamed “help me!” After a couple of false-start statements in which he seemed to dismiss and diminish the incident, Baer released a second solo statement, apologizing to his wife, children and the Giants organization and saying he would “do whatever it takes to make sure that I never behave in such an inappropriate manner again.”

On March 4, Baer stepped away from the Giants, taking “personal time” and relinquishing his CEO role, at least temporarily. Today, as expected, Major League Baseball has weighed in.

Baer has been suspended without pay through July 1. The current leave of absence, which commenced on March 4, will be converted to an unpaid suspension. During the period of his suspension, Baer shall have no involvement in the operations of the Giants. The Giants will be operated by an interim control person appointed by the ownership group in consultation with Rob Manfred. The San Francisco Chronicle reports that, after his suspension, Baer may return as CEO but will likely not be re-designated as the MLB control person, which means he will not be the person to whom baseball operations staff answers and who reports to Major League Baseball on behalf of the Giants.

Baer will likewise be required to undergo an evaluation by an expert to determine an appropriate treatment and counseling plan.

Rob Manfred issued the following statement:

“At my direction, the Department of Investigations conducted an investigation into the March 1, 2019 video-recorded incident involving Larry Baer.  I also personally met with Mr. Baer.  Based on my review of the results of the investigation, I have concluded that Mr. Baer’s conduct was unacceptable under MLB policies and warrants discipline.  In determining the appropriate level of discipline, I find that Mr. Baer should be held to a higher standard because as a leader he is expected to be a role model for others in his organization and community.  Based on my conversation with Mr. Baer, it is clear that he regrets what transpired and takes responsibility for his conduct.”

Earlier this month I detailed Major League Baseball’s history of disciplining owners. As discussed in that post, it’s a tricky business to suspend owners, as they don’t typically rely on salaries the way players do, thus it’s hard to distinguish a suspension from a vacation. Not that the Giants’ CEO position is likely to be a low-paid one. Which is to say that, while this may not be as relatively painful for Baer as it might be for a player, it’s likewise not painless. How severe one considers the discipline is likely a subjective matter.

RHP Fairbanks, Rays agree to 3-year, $12 million contract

tampa bay rays
Dave Nelson/USA TODAY Sports
0 Comments

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. — Reliever Pete Fairbanks and the Tampa Bay Rays avoided arbitration when they agreed Friday to a three-year, $12 million contract that could be worth up to $24.6 million over four seasons.

The deal includes salaries of $3,666,666 this year and $3,666,667 in each of the next two seasons. The Rays have a $7 million option for 2026 with a $1 million buyout.

His 2024 and 2025 salaries could increase by $300,000 each based on games finished in the previous season: $150,000 each for 35 and 40.

Tampa Bay’s option price could increase by up to $6 million, including $4 million for appearances: $1 million each for 60 and 70 in 2025; $500,000 for 125 from 2023-25 and $1 million each for 135, 150 and 165 from 2023-25. The option price could increase by $2 million for games finished in 2025: $500,000 each for 25, 30, 35 and 40.

Fairbanks also has a $500,000 award bonus for winning the Hoffman/Rivera reliever of the year award and $200,000 for finishing second or third.

The 29-year-old right-hander is 11-10 with a 2.98 ERA and 15 saves in 111 appearances, with all but two of the outings coming out of the bullpen since being acquired by the Rays from the Texas Rangers in July 2019.

Fairbanks was 0-0 with a 1.13 ERA in 24 appearances last year after beginning the season on the 60-day injured list with a right lat strain.

Fairbanks made his 2022 debut on July 17 and tied for the team lead with eight saves despite being sidelined more than three months. In addition, he is 0-0 with a 3.60 ERA in 12 career postseason appearances, all with Tampa Bay.

He had asked for a raise from $714,400 to $1.9 million when proposed arbitration salaries were exchanged Jan. 13, and the Rays had offered for $1.5 million.

Fairbanks’ agreement was announced two days after left-hander Jeffrey Springs agreed to a $31 million, four-year contract with Tampa Bay that could be worth $65.75 million over five seasons.

Tampa Bay remains scheduled for hearings with right-handers Jason Adam and Ryan Thompson, left-hander Colin Poche, third baseman Yandy Diaz and outfielder Harold Ramirez.