Cameron Maybin
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Giants release Cameron Maybin

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The Giants have released outfielder Cameron Maybin, per a report Friday. Maybin inked a minor league contract with the club in mid-February, but will no longer be competing for a roster spot this spring following a rough start in the Cactus League and a DUI arrest. According to NBC Sports Bay Area’s Dalton Johnson, the latter incident was not said to affect the Giants’ consideration of Maybin for a starting or backup role in 2019.

Last season, the 31-year-old rounded out a full dozen years in MLB after taking two back-to-back gigs with the Marlins and Mariners. He batted a combined .249/.326/.336 with four home runs, 10 stolen bases (in 15 chances), and 0.5 fWAR over 384 plate appearances, and was granted free agency shortly after the end of the 2018 regular season.

The Giants, meanwhile, will continue to push forward with a combination of outfielders Steven Duggar, Mac Williamson, Gerardo Parra, Matt Joyce, and Austin Slater, among a smattering of smaller names. It’s not immediately clear who they’ll tag for a backup position in center field, though there’s still time to pull in more talent — as they demonstrated after signing free agent Joyce to a minor league deal on Wednesday.

Umpire Cory Blaser made two atrocious calls in the top of the 11th inning

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The Astros walked off 3-2 winners in the bottom of the 11th inning of ALCS Game 2 against the Yankees. Carlos Correa struck the winning blow, sending a first-pitch fastball from J.A. Happ over the fence in right field at Minute Maid Park, ending nearly five hours of baseball on Sunday night.

Correa’s heroics were precipitated by two highly questionable calls by home plate umpire Cory Blaser in the top half of the 11th.

Astros reliever Joe Smith walked Edwin Encarnación with two outs, prompting manager A.J. Hinch to bring in Ryan Pressly. Pressly, however, served up a single to left field to Brett Gardner, putting runners on first and second with two outs. Hinch again came out to the mound, this time bringing Josh James to face power-hitting catcher Gary Sánchez.

James and Sánchez had an epic battle. Sánchez fell behind 0-2 on a couple of foul balls, proceeded to foul off five of the next six pitches. On the ninth pitch of the at-bat, Sánchez appeared to swing and miss at an 87 MPH slider in the dirt for strike three and the final out of the inning. However, Blaser ruled that Sánchez tipped the ball, extending the at-bat. Replays showed clearly that Sánchez did not make contact at all with the pitch. James then threw a 99 MPH fastball several inches off the plate outside that Blaser called for strike three. Sánchez, who shouldn’t have seen a 10th pitch, was upset at what appeared to be a make-up call.

The rest, as they say, is history. One pitch later, the Astros evened up the ALCS at one game apiece. Obviously, Blaser’s mistakes in a way cancel each other out, and neither of them caused Happ to throw a poorly located fastball to Correa. It is postseason baseball, however, and umpires are as much under the microscope as the players and managers. Those were two particularly atrocious judgments by Blaser.