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Minor League Baseball worried about low wages and gambling leading to corruption

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Now that there is about to be legalized sports betting all over the country, many in baseball have voiced concern about the “integrity” of the game. Mostly this has been Rob Manfred who has attempted to get a cut of various state’s sports betting action by claiming it’s necessary to protect baseball from the scourge of corruption.

As we’ve argued here many, many times, this seems more like an attempt at a cash grab by Major League Baseball than it is about genuine concern over gambling corrupting the game. I mean, yes, I am certain they do care about gambling being a problem, but given how closely the league has partnered up with gambling interests like MGM, it’s safe to say that it’s about much more than that. In any event, given how well players and even managers and umpires are paid, the risks of gamblers getting to ballplayers and game officials and having them throw games or something is way, way less than it might’ve been at an earlier time in baseball’s history.

The same cannot be said for minor league baseball, however. There the players are paid peanuts. Indeed, Major League Baseball made a point of lobbying Congress in order to get a law passed that makes sure they are paid peanuts in perpetuity. Gee, I wonder how those two things play together?

As the Boston Herald reports, not too well. At least not in the mind of Minor League Baseball’s president and CEO Pat O’Connor, who specifically cites the low wages of minor leaguers and says “it’s not if, but when” there is corruption from gambling on baseball. O’Connor lays out a scenario regarding how a player could, quite easily, become compromised. The general idea is that even the smallest favor for the smallest amount of money, while not truly threatening the game directly, could lead to a player being blackmailed under threat of being banned from the game.

Is that realistic? Hard to say. Seems a little cinematic in the way O’Connor describes it, but I’m sure people looking to get an edge illegally are more creative than he or I could ever be. There is not a lot of wagering on minor league baseball at the moment, so perhaps the concern is overstated, but that could certainly change, especially there are more and more places putting lines on sports across the country. And, of course, minor leaguers sometimes become major leaguers, so if a player is compromised early on like O’Connor says, it could prove to be a problem further down the road. I don’t know.

I do know one thing, though: casinos do not want compromised games. It could kill their whole business if people think a fix is in. Which makes me wonder if pressure from MLB’s partners in the casino business will lead to better pay for minor leaguers more quickly than any fleeting sense of human decency on MLB’s own part ever could.

 

Brewers have 3 positive COVID tests at alternate site

Jeff Hanisch-USA TODAY Sports
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MILWAUKEE — The Brewers had two players and a staff member test positive for the coronavirus at their alternate training site in Appleton, Wisconsin.

Milwaukee president of baseball operations David Stearns confirmed the positive results Saturday and said they shouldn’t impact the major league team. Teams are using alternate training sites this season to keep reserve players sharp because the minor league season was canceled due to the pandemic.

Stearns said the positive tests came Monday and did not name the two players or the staff member. Players must give their permission for their names to be revealed after positive tests.

The entire camp was placed in quarantine.

“We have gone through contact tracing,” Stearns said. “We do not believe it will have any impact at all on our major league team. We’ve been fortunate to get through this season relatively unscathed in this area. Unfortunately, we weren’t able to get all the way there at our alternate site.”

Milwaukee entered Saturday one game behind the Reds and Cardinals for second place in the NL Central, with the top two teams qualifying for the postseason.

The Brewers still will be able to take taxi squad players with them on the team’s trip to Cincinnati and St. Louis in the final week of the season. He said those players have had repeated negative tests and the team is “confident” there would be no possible spread of the virus.

“Because of the nature of who these individuals were, it’s really not going to affect the quarantine group at all,” Stearns said. “We’re very fortunate that the group of players who could potentially be on a postseason roster for us aren’t interacting all that much with the individuals that tested positive.”