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Yankees, Luis Severino agree to four-year, $40 million contract extension

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Luis Severino and the New York Yankees were expected to go to an arbitration hearing, but it was called off. The Yankees signed Luis Severino to a four-year, $40 million contract extension through the 2022 season, with a club option for the 2023 season.

The year-by-year details, according to Jeff Passan:

2019: $4M+$2M bonus
2020: $10M
2021: $10.25M
2022: $11M
2023 (club option): $15M with $2.75M buyout

To put that in perspective, two pitchers who just won in their third year of arbitration — Trevor Bauer and Gerrit Cole — will make $13 million and $13.5 million, respectively. This is a maximum guaranteed $52.25 million deal for five years for one of the best pitchers in the game. Based on various projections for arbitration for Severino, he’s probably costing himself as much as $15 million over the deal’s first four years and several million if the Yankees pick up the 2023 option. That said — as is the case with all such extensions — this gives him money in the bank now and protection against injury.

Severino filed for a $5.25 million salary while the Yankees countered at $4.4 million. Aaron Nola, who was also in his first year of arbitration-eligibility but who was not a Super 2, recently agreed to a four-year, $45 million extension with the Phillies with a similar fifth-year option.

Severino, 24, finished ninth in AL Cy Young Award balloting last season, going 19-8 with a 3.39 ERA and a 220/46 K/BB ratio in 191 1/3 innings. He also finished third in AL Cy Young Award balloting in 2017.

Nationals award World Series shares to scouts and minor league personnel

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Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports some good news: the Nationals have chosen to include scouts and minor league personnel as part of the group receiving World Series shares for the 2019 season. Manager Dave Martinez said it’s the first time he’s heard of such a thing happening.

The full postseason shares were announced last month. The Nationals players’ pool was in excess of $29 million. Obviously, adding such a large group of people reduces the average share for everyone else, but it is a significant bonus for the scouts and minor league personnel. We have noted many times here that an unnecessarily high percentage of minor leaguers — as well as many ancillary workers for minor league teams — don’t make a living wage. This bonus could mean someone is able to make rent, buy groceries, or buy their kids holiday gifts.

Really classy move on the Nationals’ part. Hopefully it becomes standard practice. Or, better yet, hopefully it becomes standard practice to simply pay minor leaguers and associated staff a fair wage.