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Jacob deGrom won’t negotiate with Mets after Opening Day

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When last we checked in on Jacob deGrom and the Mets, the reigning Cy Young Award winner was not pleased that talks about a long-term contract extension were not going forward. Now we learn that, if they’re going to proceed, they had best proceed quickly. Mike Puma of the New York Post reports:

After a winter of inactivity in long-term contract discussions, the reigning National League Cy Young award winner has informed team officials he will not negotiate a new deal during the season, an industry source told The Post on Tuesday. DeGrom’s camp has set Opening Day as the deadline to complete any potential long-term deal.

That’s about six weeks.

de Grom avoided arbitration with the Mets last month, agreeing to a $17 million salary for the upcoming campaign, but he obviously wants to secure his long-term future. The Mets should want to do that too, and signing deGrom to an extension seems like a no-brainer. But then again so does doing things like signing Bryce Harper and Manny Machado and there are 30 teams who seem pretty uninterested in that at the moment too. Baseball in 2019.

As Bill wrote last week, deGrom is worth a $200 million+ extension. Clayton Kershaw signed a seven-year, $215 million extension after the 2013 season. Max Scherzer signed a seven-year, $210 million contract with the Nationals as a free agent four years ago. David Price signed a seven-year, $217 million free agent contract with the Red Sox in December 2015. That same winter Zack Greinke inked a six-year, $206.5 million contract with the Diamondbacks.

deGrom went 10-9 with a major league-best 1.70 ERA and a 269/46 K/BB ratio in 217 innings last year, picking up 29 of 30 first-place Cy Young votes.

Video: Starling Marte refuses to take first base after being hit by pitch

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Pirates outfielder Starling Marte was hit on the hand by a Jack Flaherty pitch in the fourth inning of Tuesday night’s game against the Cardinals. Rather than take first base, Marte — who came to the plate with a runner on first base — insisted to home plate umpire Bruce Dreckman that the ball hit the knob of the bat, not his hand. Marte was allowed to continue his at-bat, though manager Clint Hurdle came out to discuss the ruling with Dreckman. Marte eventually grounded into a fielder’s choice. He then got caught attempting to steal second base and the Pirates scored zero runs in the inning.

According to Baseball Prospectus, a team that has runners on first and second with no outs is expected to score 1.55 runs. Having a runner on first base with one out yields 0.56 expected runs. Marte essentially cost his team a run by rejecting first base. Oops.