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Top 25 Baseball Stories of 2018 — No. 16: There were more strikeouts than hits

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We’re a few short days away from 2019 so it’s a good time to look back at the top 25 baseball stories of 2018. Some of them took place on the field, some of them off the field and some of them were more akin to tabloid drama. No matter where the story broke, however, these were the stories baseball fans were talking about most this past year.

2018 was the first season in major league history to feature more strikeouts than hits. Hitters were sent back to the dugout 41,207 times and recorded 41,019 safeties. As recently as the 1980s there would be more than 10,000 more hits than strikeouts in a season. In 2017 there were around 2,000 more hits than Ks. Now we’re in . . . this world.

It’s a boring world, frankly. Sure, we can appreciate how good the pitchers are now. How hard they throw. How nasty their stuff is. Just how well they execute pitches in the age of executed pitching. They’re doing their job and they’re doing it well and until batters can figure out what to do about it, pitchers have no reason to do things differently.

But my god is it a drag. A pitcher, a batter and a catcher are doing their thing while seven other guys on the field may as well be potted plants. There’s less running, less fielding and less excitement than every before. When the most kinetic action in any at bat is the umpire raising his arm, you’re not watching a riveting entertainment product, no matter how effective it is for one side competing. Attendance is dropping in recent years. There are are lots of reasons for that, but I’d guess that at least part of it is that games are more boring than they used to be.

The thing is, there’s not a ton we can do about it. At least not very easily. We are not going to be able to limit the number of pitchers who throw 100 m.p.h. with ungodly breaking and offspeed stuff, even in hitters’ counts. We’re not likely going to ban defensive shifts, which encourage hitters to use uppercut swings — all the easier to whiff on — in an effort to elevate the ball more often.

The best I can think of at the moment is to raise the lower limit of the strike zone from below the knee to above the knee, eliminating the incentive for pitchers to throw those low pitches which are hard for hitters to do anything with, leading to a lot of strikeouts or a lot of weak grounders. The problem with that, of course, is one of unintended consequences. Any change to the circumstances of pitching over the years has led to massive increases or decreases in offense. Now that pitchers don’t get inside and outside strikes called like they did in the 1980s and 90s, cutting some of that zone down may lead to so many pitches over the plate that offense will spike. We don’t really want that, though, right? We just want to cut down on strikeouts. That’s not exactly the same thing.

All of which is to say that we’re likely to see the strikeout parade continue. Which is good news for pitchers but bad news for the rest of us, I think.

Bryce Harper letting his haters be his motivators

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When the Phillies go on the road, and even sometimes at home, outfielder Bryce Harper is a magnet for hecklers. Fans have been chanting things like “overrated” at him. But it hasn’t really been working.

Last night, Harper was being booed and ridiculed by fans at Fenway Park according to MLB.com’s Jessica Camerato. Harper shut them up with a two-run home run in the fifth inning which gave the Phillies a 3-2 lead, the score by which they would eventually win. Manager Gabe Kapler said, “I thought it was really interesting. There were some hecklers. I don’t know if they were Red Sox [fans] or who they were, but they were on him pretty good up until that moment. That was a pretty explosive moment for the dugout celebration.”

It is not the only time Harper has been heckled only to homer shortly thereafter.

Last week, Harper was 0-for-3 in a game against the Cubs. On his way back to the dugout, a fan yelled, “$330 million, 0-for-3.” Per TMZ Sports, Harper responded, “Shut the f–k up, stupid!” He would go on to hit a walk-off grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning.

Two weeks ago in San Francisco, fans chanted “overrated” at Harper. He promptly hit one of his two home runs in the Phillies’ 9-6 victory.

Harper was on the cover of Sports Illustrated in 2009, when he was 17 years old. Tom Verducci compared him to LeBron James, a comparison that has stuck with Harper ever since. He was the No. 1 overall selection in the 2010 draft. He’s more than used to being in the spotlight and more than used to hearing a little criticism. He lets his haters be his motivators. Maybe his detractors should approach it from the opposite angle — try killing him with kindness. Yelling, “Bryce, you have great hair!” might get him to go on an 0-for-54 skid.