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Joe Kelly’s deal with Dodgers officially announced

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Eight days after the deal was first reported, the Dodgers have officially announced that they have signed Joe Kelly. The details: a three-year, $23 million contract with a $12 million club option for 2022. The buyout for the option is $4 million, so Kelly is guaranteed at least $27 million and as much as $35 million.

There is likewise a games finished incentive in the deal which could make Kelly a lot of money if, for some reason, he displaces Kenley Jansen as the Dodgers’ closer.

Specifically, he’ll get $250,000 for 30 games finished and another $250,000 for every five more games he finishes, on up to 60 games. It’s not saves, mind you — you can’t structure incentives on performance stats — it’s merely on games finished. Which means that Kelly will likely be lobbying Dave Roberts to let him be the last guy mopping up blowouts. Or, well, at least I would be if I were him. For Roberts’ part, figure on having him split setup duties with Pedro Baez.

Kelly, 30, posted a 4.39 ERA with a 68/32 K/BB ratio in 65.2 innings out of the Red Sox bullpen during the regular season in 2018. He made this money in the postseason, however, limiting the opposition — including the Dodgers — to two runs, one earned, in 11.1 innings with a 13/0 K/BB ratio.

Rangers, Padres, White Sox to continue paying minor leaguers

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In March, Major League Baseball agreed to pay minor league players $400 per week while the sport is shut down amid the coronavirus pandemic. That provision is set to expire at the end of May. As Craig noted earlier, the Athletics will not be paying their minor leaguers starting on June 1.

Several teams are doing the right thing, continuing to pay their minor leaguers $400 per week through at least the end of June. Per The Athletic’s Levi Weaver and James Fegan, the Rangers and White Sox will each tack on another month of pay. The Athletic’s Dennis Lin reported earlier that the Padres will pay their players through the end of August. Craig also cited a Baseball America report from this morning, which mentioned that the Marlins will also pay their players through the end of August.

Frankly, if the Marlins can find a way to continue paying their minor league players, then every team should be able to do the same. The Marlins are widely believed to be the least profitable among the 30 major league clubs. Here’s hoping the rest of the league follows the Rangers’, White Sox’s, Padres’, and Marlins’ lead as opposed to the Athletics’.