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Joe Kelly’s deal with Dodgers officially announced

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Eight days after the deal was first reported, the Dodgers have officially announced that they have signed Joe Kelly. The details: a three-year, $23 million contract with a $12 million club option for 2022. The buyout for the option is $4 million, so Kelly is guaranteed at least $27 million and as much as $35 million.

There is likewise a games finished incentive in the deal which could make Kelly a lot of money if, for some reason, he displaces Kenley Jansen as the Dodgers’ closer.

Specifically, he’ll get $250,000 for 30 games finished and another $250,000 for every five more games he finishes, on up to 60 games. It’s not saves, mind you — you can’t structure incentives on performance stats — it’s merely on games finished. Which means that Kelly will likely be lobbying Dave Roberts to let him be the last guy mopping up blowouts. Or, well, at least I would be if I were him. For Roberts’ part, figure on having him split setup duties with Pedro Baez.

Kelly, 30, posted a 4.39 ERA with a 68/32 K/BB ratio in 65.2 innings out of the Red Sox bullpen during the regular season in 2018. He made this money in the postseason, however, limiting the opposition — including the Dodgers — to two runs, one earned, in 11.1 innings with a 13/0 K/BB ratio.

Brian Anderson suffers hand fracture on a hit-by-pitch

Brian Anderson
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Marlins infielder/outfielder Brian Anderson departed Friday’s 19-11 win over the Phillies with a left hand contusion, the club announced. Following an X-ray, it was then revealed that he had sustained a fracture of the fifth metacarpal — an injury severe enough that it’ll likely keep him off the field for the remainder of the 2019 season.

Anderson suffered the injury on a hit-by-pitch in the third inning. On the first pitch of the at-bat, with the bases loaded and one out, he took a 93.9-m.p.h. fastball off his left hand. The HBP forced in a run, but he doubled over in pain and was quickly examined by a member of the Marlins’ staff before officially departing the game in the top of the fourth.

It’s an unfortunate way to end Anderson’s third campaign with the Marlins. The 26-year-old has posted some career-high numbers this year, reaching the 20-homer mark for the first time and batting a healthy .261/.342/.468 with an .810 OPS and 3.0 fWAR through 510 PA. Despite the setback, he should be fully healed and ready to go well in advance of the Marlins’ spring training in 2020.