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Reds are “all over” Dallas Keuchel

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Jon Heyman — who is an inner-circle “jazz up hot stove rumors with metaphors for negotiation” guy — reports that the Reds are “all over” free agent starter Dallas Keuchel.

What that actually means is far less important than us imagining team president Dick Williams and GM Nick Krall at some club, constantly dancing up toward where Keuchel and his friends are, getting pushier and pushier. “I can buy my own drink,” Keuchel says, rolling his eyes. Williams and Krall try to act casual while, really, they’re sorta spazzing out. It’s a process.

Still, as far as rumors go this is a fun one to think about. The Reds have a hard time attracting pitchers because they play in a bandbox. They may really want someone like Keuchel, though, because of his soft-contact/groundball abilities, so maybe they’ll wildly overpay. Does that make it any more pleasant for Keuchel to pitch in Cincinnati? Not necessarily, but it certainly could make life more pleasant when he’s not pitching. The general consensus is that he’s not quite the ace he was a couple of years ago. But what if the Reds pay him like one? It may be hard to say no to a big, big offer if the Reds are prepared to bring one.

Keuchel, 30, posted a 3.74 ERA and 153/38 K/BB ratio over 204.2 innings this past season with the Astros. At the moment, he’s single and looking. Can’t fault the Reds for at least trying to dance.

Mets sign Matt Kemp to minor league deal

Matt Kemp
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The Mets have had a lot of injuries in their outfield. How many? So many that they’re bringing in Matt Kemp, who they just signed on a minor league deal. Hey, why not? He’s functionally free.

Kemp was released by the Reds earlier this month after batting just .200/.210/.283 over 62 plate appearances. While he was a pretty useful player for the first half of the 2018 season for the Dodgers, the odds of him making major contributions to the Mets this year are probably about the same odds there were on Adrián González making an impact when the Mets signed him last year. But again: what’s the harm?