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Giants release a statement regarding its co-owner’s donation to Cindy Hyde-Smith

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Over the weekend news broke that both Major League Baseball’s political PAC and one of the part-owners of the San Francisco Giants made donations to the campaign of U.S. Senator Cindy Hyde-Smith. Such donations have come under fire due to Hyde-Smith’s recents comments and actions making jokes out of lynchings and glorifying Confederate history.

Major League Baseball, facing immediate blowback on Saturday night, issued a hasty — and, frankly, poor — statement yesterday morning saying it was asking for the donation to be returned. It has not said why the donation was made in the first place. The statement, quite obviously, was an exercise in damage control.

The Giants just issued a statement of their own regarding the donation by Charles Johnson, one of the team’s many part-owners. The central point of it — Johnson is a private individual who made the donation in his individual capacity and the team can’t do anything about it — is fine. It is, as they say, what it is. The statement is pretty bad in its own right, however, in that it spends far more time trying to defend the Giants as a brand, citing the team’s philanthropic bonafides than it does talking about Johnson’s donation.

Indeed, Johnson’s name isn’t even mentioned at all [click the statement to enlarge]:

The message: “our team is great and you should support it for all of the great things it does, but in no instance should anything one of the team’s owners does reflect poorly on it. This is so much the case that we shall not even speak the owner’s name, let alone hold him accountable in any way for doing a thing we explicitly say in the first sentence of this statement we do not approve of.”

Do better, Giants. An Major League Baseball? At least make a damn effort.

 

Attempting to complete cycle, Robinson Chirinos thrown out to end game

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With his Astros trailing the Tigers 2-1, catcher Robinson Chirinos began his at-bat in the bottom of the ninth a triple shy of the cycle. He doubled in the second inning, singled in the fourth, and hit a solo homer in the seventh. Yordan Álvarez and Yuli Gurriel both struck out, leaving the Astros’ fate in the hands of Chirinos against Joe Jiménez. After working the count to 2-1, Chirinos slapped an 85 MPH slider to the gap in right-center field. A diving Travis Demeritte could not come up with the ball, but center fielder Harold Castro fired the ball back in to Gordon Beckham, who then made a perfect throw to Dawel Lugo at third base. Chirinos was tagged out for the final out of the game. No triple, no cycle. The Astros lost 2-1.

Chirinos was attempting to become the first Astro to hit for the cycle since Brandon Barnes on July 19, 2013 against the Mariners.

The Astros entered Wednesday’s game as the largest favorite in 15 seasons, according to ESPN’s David Purdum. The Astros were -500 per Caesars Sportsbook. Other sportsbooks had them at -550. So the Tigers’ win was quite the upset.

Justin Verlander went the distance in the loss. The only blemishes on his line were solo homers to Ronny Rodríguez in the fifth and John Hicks in the ninth. They were the only hits he allowed while walking none and striking out 11.