2018-19 Free Agency Preview: Outfielders

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Beginning this Saturday, baseball’s free agents will be eligible to sign with any team they want.

We’re in the process of breaking down the best available free agents by position, with some special attention paid to the top guys at each spot. We’ve already done starting pitchers, relief pitchers and corner infielders. Now let’s do outfielders.

At the outset, let us acknowledge that Nelson Cruz is a DH, obviously, but let’s also put him here anyway because there aren’t enough DHs to justify their own entry in this series. We have Marwin Gonzalez in here because he plays a lot of outfield, but he’s capable of infield work too, of course. And, though we’ve broken it down between corner outfielders and center fielders, there is obviously a lot of fluidity involved in this stuff. For some teams, Adam Jones might still make some sense as a center fielder field. For others, he’s far better suited for a corner at this point in his career. Same goes for several of these dudes.

Who’s Available?

 

Corner Outfielders

Bryce Harper
Nelson Cruz
Michael Brantley
Andrew McCutchen
Nick Markakis
Carlos Gonzalez
Marwin Gonzalez
Denard Span
Jose Bautista
Curtis Granderson
Jon Jay
Lonnie Chisenhall
Craig Gentry
Cameron Maybin
Melky Cabrera
Matt Joyce
Brandon Guyer
Matt Holliday
Gerardo Parra
Carlos Gomez
Chris Young
Gregor Blanco
Hunter Pence

Center Fielders

A.J. Pollock
Adam Jones — he’d look better in a corner at this point I suspect
Eric Young Jr.
Rajai Davis
Austin Jackson

Who’s Shopping?

It’s probably worth asking “who’s shopping for Bryce Harper” first and then, once that question is answered, to move on to “who is looking for outfield help in general.”

Given the kind of money he’s going to command, the Harper market, which we will no doubt be talking about at great length over the next month or two, seems pretty limited in terms of the number of teams:

  • The Nationals, of course, have the first crack at Harper and have not suggested that they are not interested in retaining his services;
  • The Yankees are always a candidate for a top free agent and he would make a lot of sense in the Bronx;
  • The Cubs have long been suspected as a possible suitor, though that has long been based on people reading in to Harper’s friendship with Kris Bryant. Those sorts of things — or proximity to the town where someone grew up, etc. — tend not to drive the market as much as people like to think they do. The Cubs’ clear need for offense and their deep pockets, however, make Chicago a prime candidate;
  • The Dodgers have a ton of dough too, and have worked to get under the luxury tax threshold presumably because they may want to sign someone like Harper; and
  • The Phillies have a clear need, are close to becoming a contender, have a lot of money and have not pushed back very hard on speculation that they will attempt to go after Harper.

I suppose there will be “mystery teams” in the mix as well — a lot more teams can afford Harper than they are prepared to admit; they’re simply not interested in carrying that kind of payroll — but obviously Harper’s free agency will be the lead story off the offseason. The big money clubs in need of offense will likely not address their outfield needs until he comes off the board, even if the teams with no intention of paying Harper the, what, $300 million he’s probably asking for, begin their 2019 team building while all of that is going on.

Beyond the unsuccessful Harper suitors, all of whom will likely attempt to snag an outfield bat if they don’t get him:

  • The Indians, who seem poised to let Michael Brantley go, are in need of outfield help;
  • The Mariners could use a center fielder given that Dee Gordon seems better suited for second base and Robinson Cano could slide to a corner or, if Nelson Cruz is not retained, see time at DH. The M’s will likely attempt to keep Cruz too, of course;
  • The Braves have prospects in the pipeline, but Nick Markakis was a big part of their 2018 division title. Part of me suspects they’ll try to keep him because of how much they like him personally, but if they don’t, I can still see them going after a corner outfield bat;
  • The Cardinals could use a big middle-of-the-lineup bat;
  • The Giants need offense and it may be easier to find with outfielders than anywhere else;
  • The Rockies need more offense to complement Nolan Arenado, Trevor Story and Charlie Blackmon.

Not that just the contenders need outfielders. Everyone needs outfielders. If you don’t have three of them, you tend to give up a lot of triples.

Olson blasts two HRs, Acuña has 4 hits as Strider, Braves overpower Phillies 11-4

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ATLANTA – Given a seven-run lead in the first inning, Atlanta right-hander Spencer Strider could relax and keep adding to his majors-leading strikeout total.

“That game felt like it was over pretty quick,” Strider said.

Ronald Acuña Jr. drove in three runs with four hits, including a two-run single in Atlanta’s seven-run first inning, and the Braves beat the Philadelphia Phillies 11-4 on Sunday night to split the four-game series.

“Getting a lead first is big, especially when you get that big of a lead,” Strider said. “… When we’re putting up runs, my job isn’t to be perfect. My job is to get outs.”

Following the game, Braves manager Brian Snitker announced right-hander Michael Soroka will be recalled to make his first start since the 2020 season on Monday night at Oakland.

Matt Olson hit a pair of two-run homers for Atlanta, and Strider became the fastest pitcher in modern history to reach 100 strikeouts in a season.

“It’s incredible,” said Acuña through a translator of Strider. “Every time he goes out to pitch it seems like he’s going to strike everybody out.”

Acuña hit a run-scoring triple in the fifth before Olson’s second homer to center. Acuña had two singles in the first when the Braves sent 11 batters to the plate, collected seven hits and opened a 7-0 lead. Led by Acuña and Olson, who had three hits, the Braves set a season high with 20 hits.

Strider (5-2) struck out nine while pitching six innings of two-run ball. The right-hander fired a called third strike past Nick Castellanos for the first out of the fourth, giving him 100 strikeouts in 61 innings and topping Jacob deGrom‘s 61 2/3 innings in 2021 as the fastest to 100 in the modern era.

“It’s cool,” Strider said, adding “hopefully it’ll keep going.”

Olson followed Acuña’s leadoff single with a 464-foot homer to right-center. Austin Riley added another homer before Ozzie Albies and Acuña had two-run singles in the long first inning.

Phillies shortstop Trea Turner and left fielder Kyle Schwarber each committed an error on a grounder by Orlando Arcia, setting up two unearned runs in the inning.

Strider walked Kody Clemens to open the third. Brandon Marsh followed with a two-run homer for the Phillies’ first hit. Schwarber hit a two-run homer off Collin McHugh in the seventh.

LEAPING CATCH

Michael Harris II celebrated the one-year anniversary of his major league debut by robbing Schwarber of a homer with a leaping catch at the center-field wall in the second. As Harris shook his head to say “No!” after coming down with the ball on the warning track, Strider pumped his fist in approval on the mound – after realizing Harris had the ball.

“He put me through an emotional roller coaster for a moment,” Strider said.

SOROKA RETURNING TO ROTATION

Soroka was scratched from his scheduled start at Triple-A Gwinnett on Sunday, setting the stage for his final step in his comeback from two torn Achilles tendons.

“To get back is really a feather in that kid’s cap,” Snitker said.

Soroka will be making his first start in the majors since Aug. 3, 2020, against the New York Mets when he suffered a torn right Achilles tendon. Following a setback which required a follow-up surgery, he suffered another tear of the same Achilles tendon midway through the 2021 season.

Soroka suffered another complication in his comeback when a hamstring injury slowed his progress this spring.

Acuña said he was “super happy, super excited for him, super proud of him” and added “I’m just hoping for continued good health.”

Soroka looked like an emerging ace when he finished 13-4 with a 2.68 ERA in 2019 and placed second in the NL Rookie of the Year voting and sixth in the NL Cy Young voting.

The Braves are 0-3 in bullpen committee games as they attempt to overcome losing two key starters, Max Fried (strained left forearm) and Kyle Wright (right shoulder inflammation) to the injured list in early May. Each is expected to miss at least two months.

RHP Dereck Rodriguez, who gave up one hit in two scoreless innings, was optioned to Gwinnett after the game to clear a roster spot for Soroka.

QUICK EXIT

Phillies right-hander Dylan Covey (0-1), claimed off waivers from the Los Angeles Dodgers on May 20, didn’t make it through the first inning. Covey allowed seven runs, five earned, and six hits, including the homers by Olson and Riley.

TRAINER’S ROOM

Phillies: 3B Alex Bohm was held out with hamstring tightness. … LHP José Alvarado (left elbow inflammation) threw the bullpen session originally scheduled for Saturday. Manager Rob Thomson said there was no report that Alvarado, who was placed on the injured list on May 10, had any difficulty.

UP NEXT

Phillies: Following an off day, LHP Ranger Suárez (0-1, 9.82 ERA) is scheduled to face Mets RHP Kodai Senga (4-3, 3.94 ERA) in Tuesday night’s opener of a three-game series in New York.

Braves: Soroka was 1-2 with a 4.33 ERA in eight games with Triple-A Gwinnett. He allowed a combined four hits and two runs over 10 2/3 innings in his last two starts. RHP Paul Blackburn (7-6, 4.28 ERA in 2022) is scheduled to make his 2023 debut for Oakland as he returns from a finger injury.