Mookie Betts
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The Dodgers and Red Sox are playing the longest postseason game in history

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It’s official: Game 3 of the 2018 World Series will go down in history as the longest postseason game to date. Following Jackie Bradley, Jr.’s game-tying home run in the eighth, the Dodgers and Red Sox battled through a scoreless ninth inning, then took the game all the way to the 17th to surpass the six-hour, 23-minute mark that was set in an 18-inning Game 2 of the 2014 NLDS.

Both teams had an opportunity to get ahead in the 13th. Scott Alexander issued a leadoff walk to Brock Holt in the top of the inning, then allowed a stolen base as Austin Barnes went scrambling after a pitch in the dirt. Eduardo Nuñez tried to get out of Barnes’ way, but was flipped onto his back and appeared to be injured as he stood to resume his at-bat. He grabbed onto a 1-0 slider and returned it to second base, where Alexander tossed it wide of first base and inadvertently allowed Holt to score the go-ahead run.

That is, it would have been the go-ahead run had it not been for Nuñez’s antics in the bottom of the inning. With Max Muncy standing on first, the third baseman chased after a foul pop-up and fell backwards into the stands. Muncy advanced to second, then came home to score as Yasiel Puig chopped a base hit up the middle and second baseman Ian Kinsler hurled it well past the bag. After some discussion over the legitimacy of the run scored — the Red Sox argued the ball was out of play after it ended up in the camera well — the initial call was upheld and the game was tied once more, 2-2.

Despite Muncy’s jaw-dropping fly ball that landed just foul of a walk-off home run, Game 3 is still tied 2-2 in the bottom of the 17th. And now there’s so much more at stake than the outcome of the World Series:

Won’t someone think of the Mets?

Report: Yankees could be in on Nolan Arenado

Nolan Arenado
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The Yankees appear to have moved on from free agent Manny Machado this winter, but could they be turning their attention to Rockies superstar Nolan Arenado? That’s the idea floated by Andy Martino of SNY, who hears that GM Brian Cashman has been involved in recent discussions concerning the third baseman. No official comments have been made to the press yet, though, and it’s not clear whether the Yankees would prefer to pursue Arenado prior to the 2019 season or partway through it.

The 27-year-old infielder earned his fourth consecutive All-Star nomination, Silver Slugger, and Gold Glove award in 2018 after slashing .297/.374/.561 with 38 home runs, a .935 OPS, and 5.7 fWAR across 673 plate appearances. There’s no question he’s provided immense value to Colorado’s lineup over the last half-decade, and his consistency and incredible power at the plate helped form the basis of the record $30 million arbitration figure he presented to the team last week. The Rockies countered at $24 million, however, and in doing so may have jeopardized their chances of convincing the infielder to forego free agency in 2020 and take a long-term deal instead.

Assuming he declines to negotiate an extension with the Rockies, Arenado’s decorated résumé and career-best 2018 numbers should attract plenty of interest around the league — a reality that could put considerable pressure on the Yankees (or any other interested party) to finesse a deal sooner rather than later. For now, the club is prepared to enter the 2019 season with hot-hitting third baseman Miguel Andújar, whom Martino speculates would be the “centerpiece” of any trade with Colorado.