Brandon Woodruff
Getty Images

Brewers edge past Dodgers to claim 1-0 lead in NLCS

17 Comments

Thanks to Brandon Woodruff‘s unexpected home run and a strong showing from Milwaukee’s bullpen, the Brewers hung on for a nail-biting 6-5 finish over the Dodgers to take a 1-0 lead in the NLCS on Friday.

Clayton Kershaw‘s eight-inning shutout in Game 2 of the NLDS may have put a temporary moratorium on the old “regular season ace falters in the postseason” narrative, but Friday’s performance resurrected it in full. The southpaw labored through a 23-pitch first inning, during which he surrendered a leadoff single to Lorenzo Cain, struck out Christian Yelich following a labored 10-pitch at-bat, then induced back-to-back groundouts from Ryan Braun and Jesus Aguilar to end the inning.

By the end of the second, however, the Dodgers had gained a slight advantage. Manny Machado lined a 115.6-MPH home run into the Brewers’ bullpen for a one-run lead, while Kershaw breezed through a 10-pitch inning after inducing a hit from Manny Piña and three more groundouts. The Brewers, on the other hand, had yet to advance a man past second base and decided to pull starting pitcher Gio Gonzalez for right-handed reliever Brandon Woodruff in the third.

It turned out to be a fortuitous decision: Woodruff retired Kershaw, Chris Taylor, and Justin Turner in order, then launched a home run over the center field wall to tie it up, 1-1. He’s one of just three relievers to hit a postseason homer in the last 94 years, and the only left-handed hitting pitcher to go deep against a left-handed pitcher.

Things only escalated from there. Cain laced another single into center field, followed by a seven-pitch walk to Yelich. Ryan Braun popped a slider into foul territory for the first out of the inning, but two consecutive mistakes by Yasmani Grandal — a passed ball, then a catcher’s interference call — allowed Milwaukee to load the bases. By the time Hernan Perez came up to bat, all the Brewers needed was a sac fly to take the lead, 2-1. Kershaw finished off the inning with a called strikeout against Mike Moustakas, but the damage had already been done.

Woodruff cruised through another scoreless inning after striking out the side on 14 pitches, and in the bottom of the fourth, the Brewers continued their hit parade against Kershaw. Piña drew a leadoff walk from the lefty, then scooted around to third base on Orlando Arcia‘s line drive to center — and a misplayed catch attempt from left fielder Chris Taylor. The final nail in the coffin for Kershaw? A two-RBI single from Domingo Santana, who plated another pair of insurance runs and boosted the score to 4-1 in the Brewers’ favor.

Los Angeles skipper Dave Roberts pulled Kershaw from the mound after three innings of six-hit, five-run ball, marking the starter’s shortest postseason outing to date. His replacement — veteran righty Ryan Madson — fared little better. He retired Cain and Yelich in order, then gave up another RBI single to Braun before bringing the fourth to a close.

The next several innings passed with little fanfare. Dylan Floro and Pedro Báez combined for two scoreless frames against the Brewers, while Josh Hader singlehandedly shut down the Dodgers for three straight innings, backed by a five-run lead after Aguilar unloaded a solo home run in the seventh.

The momentum finally started to shift in the Dodgers’ favor by the eighth, when they loaded the bases against an ever-revolving carousel of relievers — Xavier Cedeno, Joakim Soria, and Jeremy Jeffress — and put up a three-run spread on two RBI singles from Machado and Matt Kemp. They finished the inning just two runs shy of a tie, but managed to mount a last-minute rally in the ninth after Cain dropped a would-be game-ending line out, giving Taylor the time he needed to sprint to third base and plate the Dodgers’ fifth run of the night.

Turner, meanwhile, wasn’t quite so lucky. Down by one with two outs, he battled through a six-pitch at-bat against Milwaukee closer Corey Knebel, then struck out swinging on a 97-MPH fastball to cement the Brewers’ 6-5 win.

The teams will meet again on Saturday, when left-hander Wade Miley goes up against fellow lefty Hyun-Jin Ryu for Game 2 of the NLCS at 4:09 PM EDT. Both pitchers held their opponents scoreless in their last postseason appearances and will try to extend their respective streaks as the Brewers look for a 2-0 lead in the series and the Dodgers attempt to pull even with their first Championship Series win.

Attempting to complete cycle, Robinson Chirinos thrown out to end game

Leslie Plaza Johnson/Icon Sportswire via Getty Images
Leave a comment

With his Astros trailing the Tigers 2-1, catcher Robinson Chirinos began his at-bat in the bottom of the ninth a triple shy of the cycle. He doubled in the second inning, singled in the fourth, and hit a solo homer in the seventh. Yordan Álvarez and Yuli Gurriel both struck out, leaving the Astros’ fate in the hands of Chirinos against Joe Jiménez. After working the count to 2-1, Chirinos slapped an 85 MPH slider to the gap in right-center field. A diving Travis Demeritte could not come up with the ball, but center fielder Harold Castro fired the ball back in to Gordon Beckham, who then made a perfect throw to Dawel Lugo at third base. Chirinos was tagged out for the final out of the game. No triple, no cycle. The Astros lost 2-1.

Chirinos was attempting to become the first Astro to hit for the cycle since Brandon Barnes on July 19, 2013 against the Mariners.

The Astros entered Wednesday’s game as the largest favorite in 15 seasons, according to ESPN’s David Purdum. The Astros were -500 per Caesars Sportsbook. Other sportsbooks had them at -550. So the Tigers’ win was quite the upset.

Justin Verlander went the distance in the loss. The only blemishes on his line were solo homers to Ronny Rodríguez in the fifth and John Hicks in the ninth. They were the only hits he allowed while walking none and striking out 11.