Manny Machado
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Video: Manny Machado, Brandon Woodruff trade home runs in Game 1 of the NLCS

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The Brewers kept Gio Gonzalez on the mound for just two innings as they kicked off Game 1 of the National League Championship Series against the Dodgers on Friday. Gonzalez expended 32 pitches in that span and fired off a 1-2-3 inning to retire the side in the first. In the second inning, he wasn’t quite so lucky:

The blistering line drive home run from Manny Machado clocked in at a whopping 115.6 MPH and needed just 173 feet to clear the fence and land in the right-field bullpen. According to Statcast, the 25-year-old slugger hasn’t hit a harder home run since the beginning of the Statcast era in 2015.

With Clayton Kershaw on the mound and Gonzalez gone, it looked as though the Dodgers had a chance of keeping their slim lead over the Brewers, at least for a little while. Right-hander Brandon Woodruff replaced Gonzalez at the top of the third inning and retired the next three batters, polishing off the top half of the inning with a three-pitch strikeout to Justin Turner.

And then, on a 2-2 fastball from Kershaw in the bottom of the inning, he punched a leadoff home run of his own:

The massive 407-footer not only evened the score, but placed Woodruff in rare company as well. Per Christopher Kamka of NBC Sports Chicago, the last relief pitcher to register a postseason home run was Travis Wood, who logged a solo homer for the Cubs during the 2016 NLDS. Prior to that? Rosy Ryan did it in the World Series… for the 1924 New York Giants.

The Brewers currently lead 2-1 in the fourth following Hernan Perez‘s go-ahead sac fly off of Kershaw.

Rockies, Trevor Story agree on two-year, $27.5 million contract

Trevor Story
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ESPN’s Jeff Passan reports that the Rockies and shortstop Trevor Story have come to terms on a two-year, $27.5 million deal, buying out his two remaining years of arbitration eligibility.

Story, 27, and the Rockies did not agree on a salary before the deadline earlier this month. Story filed for $11.5 million while the team countered at $10.75 million. The average annual value of this deal — $13.75 million — puts him a little bit ahead this year and likely a little bit behind next year.

This past season in Colorado, Story hit .294/.363/.554 with 35 home runs, 85 RBI, 111 runs scored, and 23 stolen bases over 656 trips to the plate. He also continued to rank among the game’s best defensive shortstops. Per FanGraphs, Story’s 10.9 Wins Above Replacement over the last two seasons is fifth-best among shortstops (min. 1,000 PA) behind Alex Bregman, Francisco Lindor, Xander Bogaerts, and Marcus Semien.

With third baseman Nolan Arenado likely on his way out via trade, one wonders if the same fate awaits Story at some point over the next two seasons.