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Report: Dodgers minor leaguer sexually assaulted hotel maid in 2015

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The Daily Beast reports this morning that, in 2015, a Dodgers minor leaguer who was assigned to the Arizona Instructional League sexually assaulted a hotel maid. The article raises questions as to how the Dodgers subsequently handled the matter given that the player was soon signed by another team.

According to the report, the player had been harassing the maid, making inappropriate comments to her and asking her out on a date despite her clearly signaling that she was not interested. This went on for some time until, eventually, he grabbed the maid from behind, she pushed him off and he grabbed her again. He eventually relented and the maid reported the incident to hotel staff.

According to internal emails, the Dodgers investigated the incident and, by all indications, believed the maid’s account. High-ranking officials were in the loop, including then-head of player development Gabe Kapler who said in an email that he was “embarrassed for our organization.” Another Dodgers official said that the player was lucky not to be in jail. The police were not called, it seems, as the maid did not wish to alert authorities.

There was not, however, any suggestion that the Dodgers notified Major League Baseball about the incident. Rather, they handled the matter internally, taking the player out of Arizona and assigning him to the Dominican Republic developmental league. A couple of months later the Dodgers released him, but he was soon signed by another organization, presumably one with no knowledge of his history. The player’s identity was not reported by the Daily Beast as he was not charged with a crime.

As the Daily Beast notes, the fact that the alleged perpetrator was punished by one team but allowed to play for another soon after without either the other team or the league knowing about it reveals a gap in how MLB handles allegations of sexual assault across the league. For its part, MLB said it “considers the matter closed.”

One would think that, in light of this report, MLB would do better than that and would, instead, explain why a team was allowed to keep such a serious matter quiet and why teams are not required to alert the league of such incidents.

 

Buster Posey has opted out of the season

Buster Posey has opted out
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Buster Posey has opted out of the 2020 MLB season. The San Francisco Giants have issued a statement saying that they “fully support Buster’s decision. Buster is an integral part of our team and will be sorely missed, but we look forward to having him back in 2021.”

Posey and his wife are adopting identical twin girls who were born prematurely and who are currently in the NICU and will be for some time. They are stable, but obviously theirs is not a situation that would be amenable to the demands of a baseball season as it’s currently structured.

Poset had missed all of the Giants’ workouts so far, Recently he said, “I think there’s still some reservation on my end as well. I think I want to see kind of how things progress here over the next couple of weeks. I think it would be a little bit maybe naive or silly not to gauge what’s going on around you, not only around you here but paying attention to what’s happening in the country and different parts of the country.” He said that he talked about playing with his wife quite a great deal but, really, this seems like a no-brainer decision on his part.

In opting out Posey is foregoing the 60-game proration of his $21.4 million salary. He is under contract for one more year at $21.4 million as well. The Giants can pick up his 2022 club option for $22 million or buy him out for $3 million.

A veteran of 11 seasons, Posey has earned about $124 million to date. Which seems to be the common denominator with players who have opted out thus far. With the exception of Joe Ross and Héctor Noesí, the players to have opted out thus far have earned well above $10 million during their careers. Players that aren’t considered “high risk” and elect not to play do not get paid and do not receive service time.