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Yankees face elimination in Game 4

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Aaron Boone managed last night’s game like it was some random night in June. He had better manage with a bit more urgency tonight because, for the Yankees, it’s win or stay home.

The Red Sox have a bit more margin for error. A win tonight and they reach the ALCS for the first time since 2013, which they won and followed up with their last World Series title. A loss and, hey, they get Game 5 Thursday night at Fenway Park. They obviously want to take care of business here. Both because advancing is the point but also because, if you’re the Red Sox, the post-loss recriminations for an ugly postseason in the Yankee Universe will be hilariously entertaining.

All of that said, I’ve seen some clever wags portray tonight’s contest as a lost cause, all but guaranteeing a Red Sox victory and the end of the Yankees season. I’m not gonna sit here and say the Yankees are in great shape — They were utterly humiliated last night and Boone’s bullpen mismanagement will have at least some carry-over effects tonight — but if we’ve learned anything in watching the Yankees and Red Sox in the postseason over the years it’s that what happens one day has little bearing on what happens the next and no one, ever, is out of it until they are actually out of it.

Tonight’s matchup:

Red Sox vs. Yankees
Ballpark: Yankee Stadium
Time: 8:07 PM Eastern
TV: TBS
Pitchers: Rick Porcello vs. CC Sabathia
Breakdown:

Porcello was originally lined up to start Game 3, but he pitched an inning of relief in Game 1 and the decision was made to push him back a day. That worked out just fine for the Sox — Nate Eovaldi was fantastic last night — and now Porcello is good to go here, his Game 1 performance serving like a glorified bullpen session.

Porcello was 2-0 with a 2.31 earned run average in four starts against the Yankees in 2018, including an outstanding outing on August 3 in which he allowed one run on one hit and struck out nine, needing only 86 pitches to do it, in a complete game victory. Notably absent that day were Aaron Judge and Gary Sanchez, each of whom were on the disabled list. Also: that game took two hours and fifteen minutes. Don’t expect the same tonight.

For the Yankees it’s all on CC Sabathia’s shoulders. The big man does not go deep into game like he used to, but since he has not pitched since September 27, he should have a bit more stamina. Not that Boone, after last night’s debacle, is likely to keep Sabathia in for long if there’s even a hint of trouble. If anything it would not shock me to see Boone overcorrect and have too quick a hook on Sabathia tonight.

When Sabathia is pulled, it’ll be in favor of a mostly-rested Yankees pen. At least a mostly-rested good part of the Yankees pen. Chad Green was inserted too late last night but he went an inning and two-thirds, throwing 29 pitches, so don’t expect too much from him in Game 4. The other Yankees horses, however — David Robertson, Dellin Betances, Zach Britton and Aroldis Chapman — are all fresh.

The last time Sabathia faced the Sox came on August 2. He gave up three runs early, was pulled, and the Sox went on to win in a blowout. Which, when you think about it, was pretty much what happened last night.

An omen? Or have the Yankees gotten such ugly games out of their system by now?

The Yankees and Red Sox will play on artificial turf in London

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Major League Baseball wants to give the United Kingdom a taste of America’s past time when the Yankees and Red Sox visit next month. Based on the playing surface they’re going to use, however, they may as well have sent the Blue Jays and the Rays:

Major League Baseball has access to Olympic Stadium for 21 days before the games on June 29 and 30, the sport’s first regular-season contests in Europe, and just five days after to clear out. The league concluded that there was not enough time to install real grass.

Starting June 6, gravel will be placed over the covering protecting West Ham’s grass soccer pitch and the running track that is a legacy from the 2012 Olympics. The artificial turf baseball field, similar to modern surfaces used by a few big league clubs, will be installed atop that.

At least they will not use the old-style sliding pits/turf infield that you used to always see. That’ll all be dirt. There are comments in the article about how it’s a cost savings too since they’re going back next year and won’t have to bulldoze and re-grow grass. Aaron Boone and Xander Bogaerts were asked and they don’t seem to care since it’s similar to the surface they play on in Toronto or down in Florida against the Rays.

Still, this is whole deal is not aimed at doing whatever minimally necessary to pull off a ballgame. It’s supposed to be a showcase on a global stage in a world capital. I have no idea how anyone thinks that doing that on a surface baseball has decided is obsolete for baseball playing purposes unless the ballpark is either outdated or in an arid environment is a good idea.

It’s certainly not baseball putting its best foot forward. It could’ve avoided this by choosing a different venue or even building a temporary one like MLB has done on occasion in the past. That, I suppose, would limit the revenue-generation capacity of these games, however, so you know that was off the table in this day and age.

Yankees and Red Sox on turf. What a decision.