Russell Martin
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Russell Martin will manage the Blue Jays’ final game of the season

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With the Blue Jays long-since eliminated from this year’s postseason, manager John Gibbons is ready to let the team cut loose for their last game of 2018. When the team faces off against the Rays on Sunday, veteran catcher Russell Martin will take the reins as the club’s unofficial manager. Per MLB.com’s Gregor Chisholm, the title transfer is an informal one: Gibbons will still assume responsibility for the outcome of the game and add the win (or loss) to his own record, though Martin will be tasked with all in-game decisions.

It’s been a slow month for Martin, who was all but erased from the lineup as the Blue Jays focused on developing their cadre of young backstops this September. While the 35-year-old was originally promised a reduced role behind Danny Jansen, Reese McGuire, and Luke Maile, he hasn’t seen a single start behind the dish since August 29 and hasn’t played at all since September 3, when he appeared at third base in lieu of Yangervis Solarte and Aledmys Diaz. He’ll finish the year with a career-worst .194/.338/.325 batting line, 10 home runs, and 0.5 fWAR through 352 plate appearances.

Whether or not Martin has given any thought to a future in managing is unclear, though he still has another year left on his contract with the team (and another $20 million to collect as well). Gibbons told reporters that the catcher would make an “ideal” manager someday, but Sunday’s game won’t serve as any kind of audition on that front. Chisholm adds that it’s just a “quirky little fun thing” the skipper has decided to do and, to that end, it promises to be a fitting end to a difficult year for Martin.

The Royals are paying everyone. Why can’t all of the other teams?

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Over the past several weeks we’ve heard a lot of news about teams furloughing front office and scouting staff, leveling pay cuts for those who remain and, most recently, ceasing stipends to minor league players and releasing them en masse. The message being sent, intentionally or otherwise, is that baseball teams are feeling the pinch.

The Kansas City Royals, however, are a different story.

Jon Heyman reported this afternoon that the Royals are paying their minor leaguers through August 31, which is when the minor league season would’ve ended, and unlike so many other teams, they are not releasing players either. Jeff Passan, meanwhile, reports that the Royals will not lay any team employees off or furlough anyone. “Nearly 150 employees will not take pay cuts,” he says, though “higher-level employees will take tiered cuts.” Passan adds that the organization intends to restore the lost pay due to those higher-level employees in the future when revenue ramps back up, making them whole.

While baseball finances are murky at best and opaque in most instances, most people agree that the Royals are one of the lower-revenue franchises in the game. They are also near the bottom as far as franchise value goes. Finally, they have the newest ownership group in all of baseball, which means that the group almost certainly has a lot of debt and very little if any equity in the franchise. Any way you slice it, cashflow is likely tighter in Kansas City than almost anywhere else.

Yet the Royals are paying minor leaguers and front office employees while a great number of other teams are not. What’s their excuse?