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It’s unclear who is running the Orioles

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The 2018 Baltimore Orioles have lost 104 games already and will go down in history as one of the worst teams ever.

Not the worst team. There were a lot of teams that were bigger train wrecks than this crew. But they would be invited to the train wreck party. They’d have a seat at the train wreck adult table and would be more likely to help take the other guests’ train wreck coats as they arrived than they would have to ask where the train wreck bathroom was, for example. They could help themselves to the train wreck liquor cabinet without asking permission because, hey, they’re good.

OK, that metaphor was bad to begin, got worse as it went along with and needs a LOT of work to fix. But the same can be said about the Baltimore Orioles too. Fixing the metaphor only requires me to workshop it on my laptop a bit. Fixing the Orioles requires someone to take charge of a massive rebuild.

There’s only one problem with that:

As the Orioles barrel toward their worst season in franchise history, they need to decide more than just the futures of manager Buck Showalter and lead baseball executive Dan Duquette.

Major League Baseball wants to know who in the Orioles’ ownership group is running the club, and how the team plans to operate in the future, according to major-league sources.

That’s Ken Rosenthal at The Athletic, reporting that the league has not heard from Peter Angelos all year and wants to know who, in reality, is the control person of the club.

That’s a specific position within MLB hierarchy, by the way. Each team has a “control person” that answers to the league. Usually that’s easy to figure out — with the Yankees it’s Hal Steinbrenner, for example — but it’s pretty messy with the Orioles, as longtime owner Peter Angelos, 89, is reported to be in failing health. Rosenthal reports that his sons, John and Louis, are in charge, but it’s unclear who might have final word.

It’s probably more important for the organization to have someone clearly in charge than it is for MLB. Because, as noted above, the club needs to rebuild and, at the moment, both the manager and the GM are lame ducks. Neither of the Angelos sons are talking to the press however, and it’s unclear what’ll happen to them.

It should be a fun offseason in Baltimore.

Report: Mariners CEO John Stanton denies allegations made by Dr. Lorena Martin

Dr. Lorena Martin
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Last month, Mariners former director of high performance, Dr. Lorena Martin, was dismissed from the club after the first year of her three-year contract. She made serious allegations of racism and sexism against the Mariners in the days that followed, all of which have been the subject of multiple investigations by the team itself as well as Major League Baseball. On Friday evening, Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic published an email that had purportedly been sent to Mariners staff members by CEO John Stanton.

The email itself was printed here in full (subscription required) and basically rehashes everything the Mariners said in an official statement on Monday: That the team continues to deny allegations of racist and sexist behavior by general manager Jerry Dipoto, manager Scott Servais, and farm director Andy McKay because they are “completely inconsistent with who they are and what the Seattle Mariners stand for.”

Stanton added that no one had stepped forward to corroborate Martin’s accusations so far, and also went out of his way to mention that he had never personally observed members of the Mariners personnel “making disparaging, racist or sexist comments” during two trips to the Dominican Republic. The email concluded with an invitation for other staff members to speak up if they had any differing experiences or concerns about the team.

According to multiple reports from the Seattle Times and Tacoma News Tribune, among other outlets, Martin has yet to reveal a number of incriminating emails she claimed to have in her possession, nor has any staff member publicly supported her previous statements on her wrongful termination or the toxic culture within the club. That doesn’t mean, however, that the allegations she made against the Mariners are false, just as Stanton’s claim that he never personally witnessed instances of racism and sexism within the organization doesn’t mean that racist and sexist statements and actions were never made. As Bill pointed out, Martin has likely burned all bridges within the organization and, more significantly, throughout the league as well. It stands to reason that others would feel hesitant to come forward in light of the harsh ramifications that typically await whistleblowers in this kind of situation.

We’ll update this story as it continues to develop.