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It’s unclear who is running the Orioles

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The 2018 Baltimore Orioles have lost 104 games already and will go down in history as one of the worst teams ever.

Not the worst team. There were a lot of teams that were bigger train wrecks than this crew. But they would be invited to the train wreck party. They’d have a seat at the train wreck adult table and would be more likely to help take the other guests’ train wreck coats as they arrived than they would have to ask where the train wreck bathroom was, for example. They could help themselves to the train wreck liquor cabinet without asking permission because, hey, they’re good.

OK, that metaphor was bad to begin, got worse as it went along with and needs a LOT of work to fix. But the same can be said about the Baltimore Orioles too. Fixing the metaphor only requires me to workshop it on my laptop a bit. Fixing the Orioles requires someone to take charge of a massive rebuild.

There’s only one problem with that:

As the Orioles barrel toward their worst season in franchise history, they need to decide more than just the futures of manager Buck Showalter and lead baseball executive Dan Duquette.

Major League Baseball wants to know who in the Orioles’ ownership group is running the club, and how the team plans to operate in the future, according to major-league sources.

That’s Ken Rosenthal at The Athletic, reporting that the league has not heard from Peter Angelos all year and wants to know who, in reality, is the control person of the club.

That’s a specific position within MLB hierarchy, by the way. Each team has a “control person” that answers to the league. Usually that’s easy to figure out — with the Yankees it’s Hal Steinbrenner, for example — but it’s pretty messy with the Orioles, as longtime owner Peter Angelos, 89, is reported to be in failing health. Rosenthal reports that his sons, John and Louis, are in charge, but it’s unclear who might have final word.

It’s probably more important for the organization to have someone clearly in charge than it is for MLB. Because, as noted above, the club needs to rebuild and, at the moment, both the manager and the GM are lame ducks. Neither of the Angelos sons are talking to the press however, and it’s unclear what’ll happen to them.

It should be a fun offseason in Baltimore.

Shawn Tolleson retires from baseball

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Evan Grant of the Dallas Morning News reports that reliever Shawn Tolleson is retiring from baseball. The right-hander experienced a setback in his recovery from Tommy John surgery last week.

Tolleson, who turns 31 years old on Saturday, last pitched in the majors in 2016. He had two very good years out of the bullpen for the Rangers in 2014-15, posting an aggregate 2.88 ERA with 145 strikeouts and 45 walks across 144 innings.

Tolleson signed a one-year deal with the Rays in January 2017 before undergoing Tommy John surgery several months later. The Rangers inked him to a minor league contract in December 2017, but he wasn’t able to work his way back.