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Athletics put 11 consecutive runners on base, score 10 runs in third inning vs. Orioles

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The third inning of Wednesday night’s game against the Athletics was a nightmare for the Orioles. The A’s put 11 consecutive runners on base and hung up a 10-spot in the frame against starter Andrew Cashner and reliever Cody Carroll. Here’s how it went down:

  1. Nick Martini single
  2. Jonathan Lucroy single
  3. Ramon Laureano walk
  4. Matt Chapman two-run double (2-0)
  5. Jed Lowrie RBI single (3-0)
  6. Khris Davis RBI single (4-0)
  7. Matt Olson three-run home run (7-0)
  8. Stephen Piscotty single [Andrew Cashner is then replaced by Cody Carroll]
  9. Marcus Semien walk
  10. Nick Martini single
  11. Jonathan Lucroy two-run single (9-0)
  12. Ramon Laureano pop out
  13. Matt Chapman RBI single (10-0)
  14. Jed Lowrie fly out
  15. Khris Davis strike out

For those counting at home, that inning featured eight singles, two walks, a double, and a homer.

The Orioles were already the laughingstock at the league, entering Wednesday’s action with a 41-103 record. With another loss tonight, they would be on pace to finish the season 46-116. 116 losses would rank as the fourth-most in the modern era (1900 to present). The 1962 Mets went 40-120, the 2003 Tigers went 43-119, and the 1916 Philadelphia Athletics went 36-117. A .284 winning percentage, which is what a 46-116 record comes out to, would rank as the 15th-worst in the modern era.

The O’s also entered Wednesday with a -242 run differential, which is obviously up to -252 after that disastrous third inning. That already ranks as the 11th-worst run differential in the era of the 162-game season. If we say the O’s lose 10-0 tonight [Update: they did], they would be on pace for a -282 run differential, which would be the sixth-worst in the 162-game season era. The record in a 162-game season is -337 by the ’03 Tigers.

Corey Kluber removed from his rehab game

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Part of the reason the Cleveland Indians could trade away a pitcher like Trevor Bauer in the middle of a playoff race is because they have reinforcements on the way. The primary reinforcement is Corey Kluber, who has been out since May 1 with a broken arm. Based on what happened yesterday it’s possible that the Tribe will have to wait a bit longer for that particular reinforcement to arrive.

Kluber was the starter in yesterday’s game between Triple-A Columbus and Charlotte. He managed only one inning, however, walking two and not allowing a run before being lifted due to abdominal tightness. It was said that he was removed for precautionary reasons, so it may not be an injury as opposed to everyone simply being spooked. He’ll be reevaluated today.

It’s unclear whether this will delay his return to the Indians, though it obviously isn’t a good development. As it stood before yesterday, Cleveland had hoped Kluber could make big league starts in September and be ready for the postseason.