Stephen Brashear/Getty Images

Edwin Díaz records 54th save, fifth-most all-time in a single season

3 Comments

Closer Edwin Díaz closed out the ninth inning of Sunday against the Yankees, putting a 3-2 victory in the books for the Mariners. It’s the 54th save of the season for Díaz, the fifth-most all-time in a single season. Díaz had a little help, as Mitch Haniger made a terrific diving catch on a shallow Giancarlo Stanton fly ball to end the game.

The record for saves in a season is 62 held by Francisco Rodríguez, who accomplished the feat in 2008 with the Angels. Behind him are Bobby Thigpen (57, 1990 White Sox), Éric Gagné (55, 2003 Dodgers), John Smoltz (55, 2002 Braves), and now Díaz.

Along with the 54 saves, Díaz owns a 1.84 ERA with a 118/16 K/BB ratio in 68 1/3 innings. His rate of 15.54 strikeouts per nine innings is ninth-highest in baseball history among pitchers who have thrown at least 50 innings in a season. Unsurprisingly, all 14 player-seasons with a 15 or better K/9 have occurred since 2010. Aroldis Chapman has the highest rate, averaging 17.67 strikeouts per nine over 54 innings with the Reds in 2014.

MLB has more evidence against Addison Russell than just his ex-wife’s blog post

Getty Images
3 Comments

Major League Baseball put Cubs shortstop Addison Russell on administrative leave pursuant to its domestic violence policy the other day. The thought at the time was that the move was made solely because Russell’s ex-wife, Melisa Reidy, had written a blog post reiterating past claims of domestic violence. As Ken Rosenthal reports, however, that’s not all they had:

The post alone would not have been enough for baseball to force Russell off the field under its joint domestic violence policy with the players’ union. The league had additional credible information, according to sources familiar with its investigation.

The league’s investigation includes interviews with Reidy and numerous other witnesses, and with officials gathering additional information since Russell went on leave, sources said.

Reidy’s allegations alone, once assessed by MLB, would likely be enough to warrant Russell a suspension. That there is more out there would seem to make the case against him even stronger. The upshot: I think it’s extraordinarily unlikely that Russell will be back with the Cubs this year.