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Mark Shapiro says the Blue Jays’ decision to not call up Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. “has nothing to do with business”

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Blue Jays president and CEO Mark Shapiro appeared on MLB Network Radio on Wednesday. When asked by super-prospect Vladimir Guerrero, Jr. was not called up after rosters expanded on September 1, Shapiro said the decision “has nothing to do with business.”

The full quote:

It has nothing to do with business. It has nothing to do with anything other than we think the best thing for him developmentally is to go play in Arizona [fall league] and continue to develop. We think that when he gets here (which would obviously not preclude him from making the team out of spring training next year, which would be evidence of that fact), we think he’s got a chance to be an impact player.

Guerrero, 19, spent most of his season between Double-A New Hampshire and Triple-A Buffalo. Overall in the minors this year, he hit .381/.437/.636 with 20 home runs and 78 RBI in 408 plate apeparances. Guerrero is rated as the Jays’ best prospect in baseball by MLB Pipeline.

Shapiro’s justification is obviously bunk and it will be proven to have been bunk when Guerrero doesn’t make the Jays’ 25-man roster out of spring training next year, just like the Braves with Ronald Acuña and the Cubs with Kris Bryant. Guerrero would accrue service time for the time he would be on the Jays’ roster this month, so Shapiro and his cabal want to ensure he doesn’t reach Super Two status and that the organization gains an extra year of contractual control over him. The decision to keep Guerrero off of the major league roster has everything to do with business. All the talk about helping him develop is hogwash.

The Twins didn’t want to add Byron Buxton back to the active roster after the minor league system ended. GM Thad Levine said, “I think part of our jobs is we’re supposed to be responsible for factoring service time into every decision we make. … We wouldn’t be doing our jobs if we weren’t at least aware of service-time impacts on decisions we make.”

Levine did what Shapiro did not: he said the quiet part out loud. We always have this song-and-dance about every big-time prospect that doesn’t get called up. Normally, front office execs lie through their teeth and make up some excuse, like Shapiro did, justifying keeping a star player in the minors. That creates plausible deniability and the system continues uninterrupted.

The MLBPA seems to be taking issues like service time manipulation more seriously, having recently hired a new chief negotiator. When the current collective bargaining agreement expires on December 1, 2021, hopefully the union will have successfully argued in favor of changing this system which prevents teams from putting together their best possible rosters and fans from seeing their favorite teams’ best and most exciting players.

Giants fire general manager Bobby Evans

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Earlier today, Craig wrote about a potential shake-up in the Giants’ front office. It didn’t take long for that to come to fruition. Alex Pavlovic of NBC Sports Bay Area reports that the Giants have fired GM Bobby Evans.

Evans had been with the Giants for 25 years, starting in 1994 as a minor league administrative assistant. He was promoted to director of minor league operations in 1998, became the director of player personnel in 2005, then was named vice president of baseball operations in 2009. For the last four years, Evans has been the Giants’ general manager.

In part due to Evans’ influence, the Giants were quite successful, winning the World Series in 2010, 2012, and 2014. However, the last two years have been the Giants’ worst in quite some time. The club went 64-98 (.395) last year and enters Monday’s action 72-84 (.462) despite some splashy additions in the offseason (Andrew McCutchen and Evan Longoria).

There will certainly be conversations as to whether or not it’s fair that Evans is the fall guy for the Giants’ recent lack of success. But that’s part of the deal when you’re a public-facing employee in the front office of a baseball team. Pavlovic says it seems unlikely Evans remains with the organization in a different role.

The Giants have reportedly been considering hiring a “high-profile baseball operations executive” to push the team in a new direction. Bob Nightengale of USA TODAY Sports reports that Ned Colletti is the favorite to become the new GM. The offseason is still more than a month away, so the Giants have some time to stew on their candidates and not make any rash decisions.