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Old-timers continue to point fingers, complain about baseball

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Bleacher Report’s Scott Miller has a lengthy column up in which he discusses the way the game of baseball has changed and continues to change. He quotes a number of old-timers, including Goose Gossage, Pete Rose, and Jim Leyland, who bemoan the direction in which the game has gone. They hate that starters rarely pitch deep into games, that coaches adhere to pitch counts, the rise of analytics, the lack of arguments between umpires and managers, among other things.

Miller provides his own support for the game changing for the worse. Sadly, the column reads more like Abe Simpson in the 2002 episode of The Simpsons titled “The Old Man and the Key.” Grandpa Simpson was featured in a newspaper article with the headline, “Old Man Yells at Cloud,” which has gone on to become an Internet meme. Most people, for various reasons including cognitive biases, think things back in the prime of their lives was better, regardless of whether or not that is actually true.

For example, Miller writes, “Strikeouts, power pitchers and defensive shifts have conspired to keep batting averages low and diffuse old-fashioned rallies.” However, despite the implementation of the shift to various degrees by all 30 times, BABIP hasn’t really changed. Starting with 2010 and going through 2018, the MLB average BABIP has been: .297, .295, .297, .297, .299, .299, .300, .300, .296. What we — Russell Carleton of Baseball Prospectus, more specifically — have found is that pitchers give up noticeably more walks when the shift is on than when it is not, presumably because it makes them uncomfortable.

On another subject, Gossage lamented the now-endangered manager-umpire argument spectacle. He said, “Used to be, umpires made a call and managers ran out of the dugout and threw bases and kicked dirt and brought everybody out of their seats whether you were for that team or against it. It was exciting. It had character. They’re taking every bit of character there was in the game out of it.”

That’s truly one of the most hilarious quotes of all time because two years ago, Gossage ripped José Bautista for his bat flip — an expression of character and emotion — during the 2015 ALCS. Gossage called Bautista “a f-ing disgrace to the game.” He added, “[Bautista is] embarrassing to all the Latin players, whoever played before him. Throwing his bat and acting like a fool, like all those guys in Toronto. Yoenis Céspedes, same thing.” If Gossage truly cared about baseball players and coaches having the freedom to express themselves, he wouldn’t have said what he said two years ago. He’s just latching on to something to complain about simply because it’s different from when he played.

Gossage, two years ago, also went on a rant against nerds and analytics. He did exactly that in Miller’s column. The more things change, the more they stay the same, right?

Leyland said, “My problem with it really is that that’s the way we’re grooming [starting pitchers] in the minor leagues. They throw 75 f–king pitches in the minor leagues. They say if they throw 75 they’re OK, but if they throw 76 they’re going to get hurt. Who the heck ever came up with that? It’s ridiculous. They don’t pitch innings.”

That’s just a willing misunderstanding of pitch counts. No one thinks that 76 — or 100, or 101 — pitches is extremely more dangerous than the pitch that preceded it. But each pitch is, on a scale, slightly more likely to result in injury than the one that preceded it. If one is to draw a line, one must do so arbitrarily, so we’ve chosen convenient numbers of demarcation like 100 and 75.

Miller, for some reason, also sought the opinion of disgraced former major leaguer Pete Rose. Rose is quoted as saying, “I’d have probably gotten kicked out of every game in the third or fourth inning [today]. Fans every once in a while like a fight at the ballpark. Instead of helping someone up, kick dirt on him.” Yes, what baseball really needs is a return to psychopathic behavior. Thanks for the quote, Scott.

Miller’s whole column is just a handful of 60- and 70-year-olds yelling at clouds because the game has passed them by. As with the recent Joe Simpson debacles, the game needs to hear from people who are younger, from more diverse backgrounds, and enthusiastic about the game. Maybe part of the reason people aren’t gravitating towards baseball is we put the microphone in front of the Negative Nancies and not the Positive Pauls. Let’s hear from Jessica Mendoza, Francisco Lindor, and Carlos Gómez, just to name a few. They might entice a few people to give baseball a shot instead of run in the opposite direction anytime Rose, Leyland, or Gossage speak.

There was a fight in the Wrigley Field bleachers last night

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The Pirates beat the Cubs pretty easily last night. There was far more fight in the folks from Chicago out in the bleachers.

A brawl erupted among a group of fans. It was fairly messy as far as fights go. Lots of shoving and yelling and some punches thrown but no one really distinguished themselves or covered themselves with honor or glory. Well, two people did, for wildly different reasons. The fight was recorded by Danny Rockett, who hosts a podcast for the BleedCubbieBlue website. There are two videos below showing most of the relevant action.

I will give some honor and glory points to the middle aged guy in the blue jacket in the first video who kept repeating, over and over again, “there’s no fighting in the bleachers!” He was dead wrong about that, obviously, as there was actually a considerable amount of fighting, but I respect his aspirational mantra:

There was also a guy who distinguished himself but for extremely dubious reasons. I’m talking about the guy here in this second video who hurled racist epithets at one of his adversaries. That was special, but nowhere near as special at his reaction when he realized that someone was filming him.

Listen for him saying “DON’T RECORD ME!” and, just after that, “if my unit sees that I’m dead!” Which I presume means a military unit, but I’m not sure:

It’s amazing what people will say when they don’t think anyone is documenting it. And how freaked out they get once they realize that, yeah, someone was. I’m sure if this guy hits the news once he’s identified he’ll talk about how “that’s not who he is” or something like that. Don’t listen to him if he says that. Because, as is quite clear here, that’s exactly who he is. That’s exactly who most people are who get caught saying stuff like this.