Braves broadcaster Joe Simpson implies Juan Soto is lying about his age

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Braves broadcaster Joe Simpson stuck his foot in his mouth last week, ranting on air about the Dodgers’ lack of professionalism because some Dodgers players, including Chase Utley, took batting practice in t-shirts and short pants. Simpson promptly apologized… in private… to a Braves official. And the matter was mostly forgotten about.

Simpson, however, couldn’t resist sticking his foot in his mouth again on Tuesday during the first game of Tuesday’s doubleheader between the Braves and Nationals. Outfielder Juan Soto was at the plate with the Nats leading 8-2. Simpson said, “[Soto] is — if he’s 19 — he has certainly got his man growth. He is big and strong.” Here’s a link to a clip of Simpson saying that.

Puberty in boys typically ends around 17-18 years old, though they can continue growing into their mid-20’s. The implication is that Soto — listed at 6’1″, 185 pounds — is too big for his age. That’s not supported by any evidence whatsoever. Even if Simpson wanted to justify that comment on air, he couldn’t have. According to CDC data, a 185-pound 19-year-old would be in about the 85th percentile for weight. A 73-inch-tall 19-year-old would be around the 90th percentile. Soto is above-average in size but is he abnormally big? That’s a no.

Soto was born in the Dominican Republic and Major League Baseball has seen some cases where foreign-born players have lied about their age. The most famous case was Danny Almonte, from the D.R., who lied about his age in order to play in the Little League World Series. Roberto Hernandez (formerly known as Fausto Carmona), Rafael Furcal, and Miguel Tejada — all from the D.R. — lied about their age as well.

However, there has been absolutely no evidence and not even a hint of suspicion that Soto is lying about his age. It is prejudice, plain and simple, to believe that just because Soto was born in the Dominican Republic, he may be lying about his age. If Soto were white, Simpson would not have been skeptical in the slightest.

Soto is having a historically great rookie season. Coming into Tuesday’s action, he was batting .310/.424/.556 with 13 home runs and 37 RBI in 278 plate appearances. He went 2-for-2 with three walks and an RBI in game one. In game two, he hit a solo home run to the opposite field off of Sean Newcomb in the first inning and is 1-for-3 on the night as of this writing.

Major League Baseball wonders why it’s having trouble attracting a younger, more diverse audience. Part of the reason why is because broadcasters like Simpson don’t make the game enjoyable to watch. Rather than lift players up, he tries to knock them down. Baseball needs more enthusiastic young, non-white (and non-male) broadcasters in the booth and fewer angry old white guys like Simpson.

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Update (10:17 PM ET): Ken Rosenthal of The Athletic reports that Nationals GM Mike Rizzo confronted Simpson about his comments between the first and second games of Tuesday’s doubleheader. Rizzo said, “I had a definite reaction. I handled it face to face, privately with him. I believe he understood my stance on his comments.”

Simpson didn’t exactly apologize, but he added some clarification during the broadcast for game two. He said, “If you were with us in Game 1, you might have heard me make a comment off the top of my head about if he’s 19. Well, he is. He’s bonafide 19. And he is a full-grown man. He is strong. And he is one heck of a player. You might well just write his name on the Rookie of the Year award right now.”

MLB crowds jump from ’21, still below pre-pandemic levels

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PHOENIX — Even with the homer heroics of sluggers like Aaron Judge and Albert Pujols, Major League Baseball wasn’t able to coax fans to ballparks at pre-pandemic levels this season, though attendance did jump substantially from the COVID-19 affected campaign in 2021.

The 30 MLB teams drew nearly 64.6 million fans for the regular season that ended Wednesday, which is up from the 45.3 million who attended games in 2021, according to baseball-reference.com. This year’s numbers are still down from the 68.5 million who attended games in 2019, which was the last season that wasn’t affected by the pandemic.

The 111-win Los Angeles Dodgers led baseball with 3.86 million fans flocking to Dodger Stadium for an average of 47,672 per contest. The Oakland Athletics – who lost 102 games, play in an aging stadium and are the constant subject of relocation rumors – finished last, drawing just 787,902 fans for an average of less than 10,000 per game.

The St. Louis Cardinals finished second, drawing 3.32 million fans. They were followed by the Yankees (3.14 million), defending World Series champion Braves (3.13 million) and Padres (2.99 million).

The Toronto Blue Jays saw the biggest jump in attendance, rising from 805,901 fans to about 2.65 million. They were followed by the Cardinals, Yankees, Mariners, Dodgers, and Mets, which all drew more than a million fans more than in 2021.

The Rangers and Reds were the only teams to draw fewer fans than in 2021.

Only the Rangers started the 2021 season at full capacity and all 30 teams weren’t at 100% until July. No fans were allowed to attend regular season games in 2020.

MLB attendance had been declining slowly for years – even before the pandemic – after hitting its high mark of 79.4 million in 2007. This year’s 64.6 million fans is the fewest in a non-COVID-19 season since the sport expanded to 30 teams in 1998.

The lost attendance has been balanced in some ways by higher viewership on the sport’s MLB.TV streaming service. Viewers watched 11.5 billion minutes of content in 2022, which was a record high and up nearly 10% from 2021.