Corey Kluber
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Corey Kluber completes Maddux against Angels

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Indians hurler and reigning AL Cy Young champ Corey Kluber tossed his second career Maddux on Saturday, expending just 98 pitches in his first complete game shutout of the season.

The Angels eked out three hits against Kluber, but were limited to one extra-base hit and only managed to put runners in scoring position once. In the third inning, Eric Young Jr. doubled to left field and advanced on a fly out to position himself at third base. With two outs and runners at the corners, Kluber induced a rally-killing groundout from Shohei Ohtani to end the inning.

For much of the game, there was no touching the right-hander. He needed just five pitches to get through the second inning and made short work of the heart of the order with eight pitches in the ninth. Backed by a three-run lead on Leonys Martin‘s solo home run, Michael Brantley‘s RBI single and a run-scoring passed ball from Francisco Arcia, Kluber finished his night with three hits, a walk and seven strikeouts, boosting his season totals to an AL-leading 14-6 record in 23 starts and 2.63 ERA, 1.2 BB/9 and 8.5 SO/9 across 154 innings.

Prior to Saturday’s gem, only two other pitchers have tossed complete game shutouts with fewer than 100 pitches this season: the Pirates’ Trevor Williams, whose 7-0, 84-pitch feat was helped enormously by a rain-shortened, six-inning game, and the Mariners’ James Paxton, who completed a Maddux in the conventional nine innings with 99 pitches in a 5-0 shutout against the Rays.

The Cubs played under protest after Joe Maddon disputed an ‘illegal’ pitching motion

Joe Maddon
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The Cubs found themselves in a disadvantageous position toward the end of their 5-2 loss to the Nationals on Saturday. Down by three in the ninth, they were finally looking to gain some ground against closer Sean Doolittle after wearying themselves against Stephen Strasburg for the first eight innings of the game. Instead, the game ended under protest when Cubs skipper Joe Maddon took umbrage with Doolittle’s delivery:

The issue appeared to stem from the motion Doolittle made with his left foot, a kind of “toe-tapping” gesture that Maddon believed had previously been made illegal. The official rules state that a pitcher may not take a second step toward home plate during his delivery, a stipulation that had previously been violated by Cubs’ pitcher Carl Edwards Jr.:

Comparing the two motions, however, one would be hard-pressed to characterize Doolittle’s tapping motion as a full step toward the plate. Maddon clearly didn’t see it that way, and emerged from the dugout to dispute the pitcher’s delivery twice. Following Doolittle’s first-pitch strike to Albert Almora, the manager informed home-plate umpire Sam Holbrook that the Cubs would play the remainder of the game under protest.

An official decision has not yet been announced regarding the illegality of the delivery and the validity of the Cubs’ protest. According to league rules, “the game will not be replayed unless it is also determined that the violation adversely affected the protesting team’s chances of winning.”

During the inning in question, however, the umpiring crew allowed Doolittle to continue his delivery. He helped secure the Nationals’ 5-2 win after inducing a groundout from Almora, striking out Kyle Schwarber, and getting a game-ending pop-out from Kris Bryant.

After the game, both Holbrook and Doolittle took issue with Maddon’s protest.

“In that moment, he’s not trying to do anything other than rattle me,” Doolittle told reporters. “And it was kind of tired. I don’t know, sometimes he has to remind people how smart he is and how much he pays attention to the game. So he put his stamp on it, for sure.”

Holbrook, meanwhile, said Doolittle did “absolutely nothing illegal at all.”