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And That Happened: Monday’s Scores and Highlights

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Here are the scores. Here are the highlights:

Red Sox 2, Phillies 1: David Price and Aaron Nola battled admirably for eight innings, each allowing a run, but this one would head to extras. In the 13th Eduardo Nunez led off with a single, stole second and then Blake Swihart ended things by hitting a walkoff ground rule double to drive him in. Then, after the game, the Red Sox acquired a second baseman who will probably get more playing time than Nunez going forward. You’re welcome.

Braves 5, Marlins 3: Freddie Freeman and Ronald Acuña each went deep and the Braves bullpen tossed four scoreless innings as Atlanta cut Philly’s lead in the East to a half game.

Twins 5, Indians 4: Jose Ramirez hit two home runs for Cleveland, but the game was tied in the ninth when Mitch Garver drove in the winning run with a walkoff double. The Indians have somehow dropped seven of ten against Minnesota this year.

Cardinals 5, Rockies 4: The third walkoff win of the night, this one courtesy of a Marcell Ozuna 10th inning homer. It was Ozuna’s third straight game with a homer. The Rockies had taken an early 4-0 lead in this one thanks to a Nolan Arenado grand slam, but the Cardinals came back to tie it thanks to a Jedd Gyorko homer, Harrison Bader walking with the based loaded and a Matt Carpenter RBI single, setting the stage for Ozuna.

Rangers 9, Diamondbacks 5Shin-Soo Choo homered twice and had four RBI in a game that was delayed 21 minues by a power outage due to a storm that rumbled through downtown Phoenix.  Rougned Odor hit a solo homer that gave the Rangers the lead in the seventh. The Rangers have won four in a row.

Brewers 5, Dodgers 2: Eric Thames‘ three-run homer in the third gave the Brewers an early margin that proved to be sufficient as five Milwaukee pitchers combined to tame the Dodgers. Manny Machado made his debut in Los Angeles and hit a homer, but it was too little, too late for the Dodgers. There was a power outage delay in this one too —  it lasted for 23 minutes between the first and second innings — but it was because of power grid issues, not a storm, as it never rains in southern California.

Athletics 10, Blue Jays 1: Edwin Jackson tossed five shutout innings to notch his 100th career win and the A’s pounded the Jays thanks in part to homers from Mark Canha and Stephen Piscotty and three RBI from Jonathan Lucroy. The only downside to any of this is that, with the A’s winning this year, the plan to filp Jackson — that had to the plan, right? — is no longer operative so, absent an A’s collapse in August that gets him traded in a waiver deal he won’t also get to play for his 14th team. All milestones are important, man.

Mariners 2, Astros 0: The A’s pick up no ground on Seattle, but they and the Mariners pick up a game on Houston as James Paxton twirled seven shutout innings which rendered Nelson Cruz‘s sixth inning two-run double sufficient enough offense to beat the Astros. Houston has lost five in a row and six of seven. Their lead in the AL West is down to three games.

Giants 5, Padres 3: San Diego came back from an early 3-0 deficit to tie things up with a Christian Villanueva RBI double in the eighth to force extras. Gorkys Hernandez broke that tie with a 12th inning homer and Buster Posey added an insurance run with a fielder’s choice later that inning.

Sandy Koufax to be honored with statue at Dodger Stadium

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Bill Shaikin of the Los Angeles Times reports that Hall of Fame pitcher Sandy Koufax will be honored with a statue at Dodger Stadium, expected to be unveiled in 2020. Dodger Stadium will be undergoing major renovations, expected to cost around $100 million, after the season. Koufax’s statue will go in a new entertainment plaza beyond center field. The current statue of Jackie Robinson will be moved into the same area.

Koufax, 83, had a relatively brief career, pitching parts of 12 seasons in the majors, but they were incredible. He was a seven-time All-Star who won the National League Cy Young Award three times (1963, ’65-66) and the NL Most Valuable Player Award once (’63). He contributed greatly to the ’63 and ’65 championship teams and authored four no-hitters, including a perfect game in ’65.

Koufax was also influential in other ways. As Shaikin notes, Koufax refused to pitch Game 1 of the 1965 World Series to observe Yom Kippur. It was an act that would attract national attention and turn Koufax into an American Jewish icon.

Ahead of the 1966 season, Koufax and Don Drysdale banded together to negotiate against the Dodgers, who were trying to pit the pitchers against each other. They sat out spring training, deciding to use their newfound free time to sign  on to the movie Warning Shot. Several weeks later, the Dodgers relented, agreeing to pay Koufax $125,000 and Drysdale $110,000, which was then a lot of money for a baseball player. It would be just a few years later that Curt Flood would challenge the reserve clause. Koufax, Drysdale, and Flood helped the MLB Players Association, founded in 1966, gain traction under the leadership of Marvin Miller.