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Diamondbacks close to acquiring Eduardo Escobar from the Twins

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Multiple reporters are saying that the Arizona Diamondbacks are close to acquiring Eduardo Escobar from the Twins. The deal is not done yet but is expected to be soon. UPDATE: Jeff Passan reports that the Twins are getting righty Jhoan Duran, outfielder Ernie De La Trinidad and ourfielder Gabriel Maciel from the Diamondbacks. All three are currently at A-ball Kane County.

Escobar can play all over the field. This year he has played more third base than anything, but has also seen time at shortstop and second. That flexibility has always been his calling card but this year his bat has taken a step forward. He leads the league in doubles with 37 and has an excellent line of .274/.338/.514 with 15 homers and 63 driven in.

The Dbacks need offense and, this year, Escobar has been outstanding in that department. They also likely need a third baseman given that Jake Lamb was removed from yesterday’s game with the Cubs. If Lamb does come back soon, Escobar would provide a nice upgrade over slick-fielding but weak-hitting Nick Ahmed. For that matter, he’d be a nice offensive upgrade over Lamb, who has had a terrible year at the plate.

Escobar will be a free agent at the end of the year.

Sign-stealing penalties could be ‘unlike anything seen in the sport’s recent history’

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Early this morning we learned that Major League Baseball was planning to talk to former Astros Carlos Beltrán and Alex Cora as part of the sign-stealing investigation. Late this morning Jeff Passan of ESPN reported that the investigation is, actually, going to go much wider than that.

Passan reports that Major League Baseball will not limit its focus to the 2017 Astros, who were the subject of the report in The Athletic on Tuesday. Rather, it will also include members of the 2019 Astros and will extend to other teams as well. Passan specifically mentions the 2018 Red Sox which, of course, were managed by Alex Cora one year after he left Houston, where he was A.J. Hinch’s bench coach.

Oh, it also includes recently-fired Astros assistant general manager Brandon Taubman, who the league plans to interview but who, Passan says, has hired a lawyer. Which is sort of interesting in its own right, but let’s stay on topic.

Passan:

The league is attempting to cull tangible evidence from the widespread paranoia of front offices and teams around the game about others cheating and has indicated it will consider levying long suspensions against interviewees who are found to have lied, sources said . . . The penalties for illegal activity are determined by commissioner Rob Manfred, though if the league can prove wrongdoing, the severity could be unlike anything seen in the sport’s recent history, sources said.

The Cardinals were fined $2 million when an employee, Chris Correa, hacked the Astros computer system. Correa, of course, was permanently banned from baseball and served prison time. Former Braves GM John Coppolella was likewise given a permanent ban for lying about the team’s circumvention of international signing rules. If Passan’s source is right and the league is going to level heavy penalties here, that’s where you have to start, I imagine.

To me, the stuff about Coppolella’s lying and the bit about interviewees lying mentioned in the block quote is key.

Will anyone have the hammer brought down upon them for being responsible for stealing signs? Hard to say. But they likely will if they are not forthcoming with league investigators. Which is actually a pretty decent way to handle things when one is conducting an internal investigation. Maybe you don’t give amnesty to wrongdoers in the name of information-gathering, but you do signal to them that cooperation is incentivized and lack of cooperation will be punished.

It’s an approach, by the way, that Major League Baseball notably did not take in the course of its PED investigations a decade ago. That led to a final report that had massive gaps in information and caused the league to focus on and publicize only the lowest-hanging fruit. As I argued at the time, if information-gathering, as opposed to P.R. considerations was its true aim, MLB would’ve handled it differently.

In the early stages here, in contrast, it does sound like baseball is taking this seriously. That’s a good thing.