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Reds break up Cardinals’ no-hit bid in eighth inning

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Update (9:30 PM ET): Jordan Hicks relieved Poncedeleon to start the bottom of the eighth inning. He got Adam Duvall to pop up, but Phillip Ervin then ripped a line drive single up the middle to break up the no-hit bid.

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Cardinals starter Daniel Poncedeleon made his major league debut on Monday night against the Reds in Cincinnati. He’s pitched quite well, holding the Reds hitless through seven innings. The right-hander has walked three and struck out three on 116 pitches. The high pitch count makes it highly unlikely Poncedeleon will be allowed to finish his no-hit bid.

The Cards’ offense gave Poncedeleon a run of support in the top of the sixth thanks to an RBI single by Yadier Molina. Reds starter Luis Castillo has otherwise pitched quite well himself.

At Triple-A Memphis, Poncedeleon posted a 2.15 ERA with 103 strikeouts and 48 walks in 92 innings. He was selected by the Cardinals in the ninth round of the 2014 draft. MLB Pipeline rated him as the No. 30 prospect in the Cardinals’ system.

A Cardinals pitcher hasn’t thrown a no-hitter since Bud Smith held the Padres hitless on September 3, 2001. The Reds were last no-hit on April 21, 2016 by Jake Arrieta, then with the Cubs. This season has seen three no-nos from James Paxton and Sean Manaea, as well as a combined no-hitter by four Dodger pitchers — Walker Buehler, Tony Cingrani, Yimi Garcia, and Adam Liberatore.

We’ll keep you updated as Poncedeleon and likely the bullpen attempt to navigate the final two innings. I usually use the phrase “navigate the final X innings” when I write these no-hit bid updates, but this time it certainly feels right. Juan Ponce de León was an explorer for Spain who lived between 1474-1521.

Larry Walker to wear a Rockies cap on his Hall of Fame plaque

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I guess this came out the day he was elected but I missed it somehow: Larry Walker is going to have a Rockies cap on his Fall of Fame plaque.

While it was once solely the choice of the inductee, for the past couple of decades the Hall of Fame has had final say on the caps, though the request of the inductee is noted. This is done to prevent a situation in which a cap truly misrepresents history. This issue arose around the time Wade Boggs was inducted, as he reportedly had a deal with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays to pick their cap on his plaque which, to say the least, would’ve been unrepresentative.

There have been some mildly controversial picks in the past, and some guys who would seem to have a clear choice have gone with blank caps to avoid upsetting the fan base of one of his other teams, but Walker’s doesn’t seem all that controversial to me.

Walker played ten years in Colorado to six years in Montreal and two years in St. Louis. His numbers in Colorado were substantial better than in Montreal. His MVP Award, most of his Gold Gloves, most of his All-Star appearances, and all of his black ink with the exception of the NL doubles title in 1994 came with the Rockies too. Walker requested the Rockies cap, noting correctly that he “did more damage” in a Rockies uniform than anyplace else. And, of course, that damage is what got him elected to the Hall of Fame.

Still, I imagine fans of the old Expos will take at least some issue here. Those folks tend to be pretty possessive of their team’s old stars. It’s understandable, I suppose, given that they’ve not gotten any new ones in a decade or two. Add in the fact that Walker played for the 1994 Expos team onto which people love to project things both reasonable and unreasonable, and you can expect that the Expos dead-enders might feel a bit slighted.

Welp, sorry. A Rockies cap is the right choice.  And that’s Walker’s cap will feature.