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Buyers and Sellers at the Trade Deadline: National League West

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Manny Machado’s trade completed, the rest of baseball can now turn its attention to the non-blue chip players on the market.

Yesterday, in our look-ahead to the second half, we mentioned some of the top players likely to be made available. Today we look at each team to see who is buying, who is selling, what they’re seeking and what they have to offer. Note: almost every contender, always, needs relief help.

As a reminder, the non-waiver Trade Deadline is July 31. Players traded after that date but before August 31 need to pass through waivers unclaimed before they can be traded. All players traded before August 31 are eligible to be on their new team’s playoff roster should they make the postseason.

Next up, the National League West:

Dodgers
Status: Buyers. They got the big fish in Manny Machado, but they still may look for more help given that it’s “Win the World Series or Bust this year.
Wanted: Relief pitching. Again, as always. They need to be mindful of the luxury tax threshold, however, so a larger deal in which they unload salary could be in the offing.

Rockies
Status: Buyers. They’re hotter than blazes heading out of the break and should be in the playoff hunt for the rest of the season.
Wanted: Bullpen help. They could really use a bat as well, but that’s been the case for some time.

Diamondbacks
Staus: Buyers. It’s win-now for the Snakes.
Wanted: A starter. They thought they were getting one back with Shelby Miller but his comeback was derailed with elbow issues almost as soon as it began.

Giants
Status: Buyer. They’re always buying.
Wanted: A corner outfield bat and maybe a reliever.

Padres
Status: Sellers, Heck, they already sold pretty big just today.
For Sale:  They already traded two relievers but Craig Stammen and Kirby Yates could help someone’s bullpen. Starter Tyson Ross could be a useful rental for someone.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.