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It’s pouring in Washington before the All-Star Game

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Some heavy weather moved through Washington D.C. late this afternoon, flooding dugouts at Nationals Park and sending waterfalls over the ledges of the upper decks. All a few hours before the All-Star Game.

The good news, though, is that the rains are moving out and it’s expected to be dry at game time. More good news, modern fields drain frighteningly fast, so the conditions will probably be A-OK for the game to go off on time. Indeed, a similar thing happened in Cincinnati before the 2015 All-Star Game — it was a dang monsoon — and you wouldn’t even know it by game time.

In the even things continue to be soggy and they have to postpone the game, it’ll be played tomorrow night. All signs at present, however, point to the Midsummer Classic going off as planned.

Here are some images from Washington’s monsoon:

And this, a hop, skip and a jump away from the ballpark:

Mariners sweep A’s in two-game Japan Series

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The big news, of course, is Ichiro’s retirement. But there was a baseball game that counted today as well and the Mariners took it. Seattle beat Oakland 5-4 in 12 innings to sweep the two-game Japan Series.

Ichiro may have taken an 0-for-4 in his last game, but Ryon Healy and Mitch Haniger homered for the Mariners, staking Seattle to a 3-0 lead after three. The A’s picked up two in the fifth and Seattle added one via a Jay Bruce sac fly to make it 4-2 in the seventh. Oakland tied things back up, ultimately sending it to extras when Khris Davis singled in Matt Chapman in the seventh. Davis would blow a chance to put Oakland ahead in the 11th when he struck out with the bases loaded.

In the twelfth, Domingo Santana, who hit a grand slam in Seattle’s win in the opener on Wednesday, beat out a would-be double-play with the bases loaded to drive in the go-ahead and, ultimately, winning run.

The rebuilding Mariners are now 2-0 on the young year. The A’s, who won 97 games last year, are 0-2. Viva the smallest of sample sizes.