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Report: Phillies, Giants interested in Jeurys Familia

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ESPN’s Buster Olney reports that the Phillies and Giants are among the teams interested in Mets closer Jeurys Familia. Olney adds that the Phillies may prefer to wait to see what happens on the Manny Machado and Zach Britton fronts before moving on to Familia.

Familia, 28, has racked up 17 saves with a 2.88 ERA and a 43/14 K/BB ratio for the Mets this season across 40 2/3 innings. It’s been a good bounce-back year after struggling and battling a blood clot in his right shoulder in 2017.

Familia would be a rental for any team that would acquire him, as he’s a free agent after the season. Regardless, he ranks among the best relievers available heading into the July 31 non-waiver trade deadline.

Both teams could use the bullpen help. The Phillies’ bullpen is largely young and inexperienced, and has battled inconsistency in the first half. The Giants are without closer Hunter Strickland and only got Mark Melancon back last month.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.