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Wilson Ramos to miss All-Star Game with hamstring injury

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Rays catcher Wilson Ramos will not take the field for his first-ever All-Star appearance on Tuesday. He made an early departure from Saturday’s record-setting 19-6 win over the Twins after feeling some tightness in his left hamstring that will likely merit further evaluation. The team is likely to place him on the 10-day disabled list over the next few days, though they have yet to reveal a concrete timeline for his return to the lineup.

Ramos, 30, has dealt with hamstring issues in both of his legs over the last few years, albeit nothing serious enough to merit a lengthy stay on the disabled list since 2013. Prior to his injury on Saturday, the catcher batted a stunning .297/.346/.486 with 14 home runs and an .832 OPS in 312 PA this season. This isn’t the first year he’s earned All-Star accolades, but it was to be his first time starting the All-Star Game behind the dish.

While Ramos won’t take the field for the American League All-Stars this time around, he told reporters that he still plans on bringing his family out to Washington, D.C. to enjoy the festivities throughout the week. Royals backstop Salvador Perez will presumably take Ramos’ spot in Tuesday’s starting lineup, since he’s currently listed as a primary reserve for the game.

Rangers turn the sort of triple play that has not been done in 106 years

Associated Press
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Triple plays are rare. Triple plays in which only two players touch the ball are even more rare. But last night the Texas Rangers turned a triple play that was even more rare than that. Indeed, it was the sort of triple play that had not been turned since a couple of months after the Titanic sank.

Here’s how it went down:

With the bases loaded and nobody out in the fourth inning, David Fletcher of the Angels hit a sharp one-hopper, fielded by third baseman Jurickson Profar. He stepped on third, getting the runner on second base in a force out. He then quickly tagged Taylor Ward, who had been on third base but had broken, thinking the ball was going to get through, and who froze before figuring out what to do. Profar then threw to Rougned Odor, who stepped on second to force the runner out who had been on first. Watch:

Like a lot of weird triple plays, not everyone was sure what had happened immediately. Odor, for example, had already made the third out when he touched the bag but he still attempted to tag out the runner from first, likely not yet having processed it all. The announcer wasn’t aware of it either. Understandable given how fast it all happened. It took me a couple of times watching it to figure it all out.

The historic part of it: according to STATS, Inc., it was the first triple play in 106 years in which the batter was not retired. The last time it happened: June 3, 1912, turned by the Brooklyn Dodgers against the Cincinnati Reds.